GPU MINING HASHRATES - BuriedONE

Alienware Alpha R1 is 2020

Alienware Alpha R1 in 2020*

Mistyped the title...
This is going to be a simple guide to help any R1 owner upgrade and optimize their Alpha.

Upgradable Parts

(In order of importance)
Storage Unit:
HDD OUT
SSD IN
This is by far the easiest upgrade to make and the most effective.
https://www.newegg.com/p/pl?N=100011693%20600038463
Any of those will work, just needs to be 2.5 Inch SATA.
How to Replace Video

WIFI Card:
This is like a 5-15$ upgrade. Go find any Intel 7265ngw off eBay and replace it with your current WIFI card. If you don’t want to buy used then here.
How to Replace Video

RAM:
Ram prices have tanked because of bitcoin mining, so this has become quite a cheap upgrade as well. I’d recommend 16GB just because why not, but if your tight on cash 8GB is fine.
https://www.newegg.com/p/pl?N=100007609%20601190332%20601342186%20600000401&Order=BESTMATCH
How to Replace Video

CPU:
This required the most research. I’d recommend you look through this first. The wattage of the processor slot only ranges from 35w-50w according to a developer of the Alpha (Source). The socket type is LGA 1150.
If you’re going cheap, the i5-4590t (35w) and i5-4690s (65w) are both great options.
i5-4590t
i5-4690s
The i5-4690t (45w) is also great but is hard to find from a trustworthy source for a reasonable price.
If your willing to spend $100+ then easily the i7-4790t (45w). That is probably the best processor to put in the Alpha. All 45w will be used giving you 3.9 GHz Turbo. The T series apparently runs the best on the R1 according to This Reddit post.
How to Replace Video

GPU:
Coming Soon!

Maxed out Alpha R1 specs: i7-4790t, 1TB Samsung SSD, 16GB DDR3, Nvidia Geforce GTX 860m.
(Upgrading to anything better then that is pointless)

Optimizing the Alpha R1

Peripherals

submitted by Kidd-Valley to AlienwareAlpha [link] [comments]

ProgPoW resources

Informational

May 2, 2018 EIPs/eip-1057.md at master · ethereum/EIPs · GitHub
May 3, 2018 ProgPOW/README.md at master · ifdefelse/ProgPOW · GitHub
May 3, 2018 EIP-ProgPoW: a Programmatic Proof-of-Work - EIPs - Fellowship of Ethereum Magicians
May 29, 2018 The Problem with Proof of Work - K. L. Minehan - Medium
October 25, 2018 Understanding ProgPoW - IfDefElse - Medium
Nov 17, 2018 progpow-wiki/ProgPoW.md at master · MariusVanDerWijden/progpow-wiki · GitHub
December 10, 2018 ProgPoW - A Programmatic Proof of Work by Kristy-Leigh Minehan (Devcon4) - YouTube
January 10, 2019 ProgPoW FAQ - IfDefElse - Medium
January 14, 2019 What GPU miners may not know about ProgPoW - Andrea Lanfranchi - Medium
January 17, 2019 ProgPoW: Progress Update #1 - IfDefElse - Medium
February 14, 2019 Council of Denver - HackMD
February 17, 2019 The Miners Benchmark ProgPoW - Theodor Ghannam - Medium
February 21, 2019 Ethereum ProgPoW Explained - Crypto Mining Blog
March 18, 2019 13 Questions about Ethereum’s Movement to ProgPow by Jon Stevens - Medium
March 20, 2019 Skeptical about #ProgPoW? I am too! - Bryant Eisenbach - Medium
March 27, 2019 Comprehensive ProgPoW Benchmark by Theodor Ghannam - Medium
March 28, 2019 My stance on Progpow by Martin Holst Swende
March 30, 2019 The Cost of ASIC Design - IfDefElse - Medium
April 12, 2019 Ethereum ProgPoW Update - Crypto Mining Blog
September 23, 2019 In Defense of ProgPow : ethereum
February 4, 2020 Antminer E3 Stops Mining Ethereum Classic, Just Over a Month Remaining for Ethereum - Crypto Mining Blog

Ethereum Magicians

August 2, 2108 Final Request From the GPU Mining Community - EIPs - Fellowship of Ethereum Magicians
August 26, 2018 EIP-1355: Ethash 1a - EIPs - Fellowship of Ethereum Magicians
September 3, 2108 What has to be done to get ProgPoW on Ethereum - EIPs - Fellowship of Ethereum Magicians
January 1, 2019 Guidelines for ProgPow Hardware Developers - Primordial Soup - Fellowship of Ethereum Magicians
February 2, 2019 On the progpow audit - Action Item - Fellowship of Ethereum Magicians
March 3, 2019 My technical take on ProgPow’s weakest link - EIPs - Fellowship of Ethereum Magicians
March 4, 2019 Governance concerns after listening to ~all ProgPow discussions on Core Dev calls - Process Improvement - Fellowship of Ethereum Magicians
March 29, 2019 Motion to NOT include ProgPow without audit - EIPs - Fellowship of Ethereum Magicians
March 30, 2109 ProgPoW - A Compilation of Reference Material - Core EIPs - Fellowship of Ethereum Magicians
May 23, 2019 ProgPoW Audit Delay Issue - EIPs - Fellowship of Ethereum Magicians
July 8, 2019 Ensuring ETH 1.x’s Success Without Disenfranchising The Community - Ethereum 1.x Ring - Fellowship of Ethereum Magicians
August 8, 2019 EIP-centric forking - Process Improvement - Fellowship of Ethereum Magicians

YouTube

October 8, 2018 Cardano Rust Project | Petro Public Sale | ProgPow | WSJ Attacks Shapeshift (October 2nd, 2018) - YouTube
October 23 2018 Ethereum Mining News | FPGA’s Mining | ProgPoW LIKELY | Profitability | Hard Fork Delayed 2019 - YouTube
December 13, 2018 Why ProgPoW is BAD for Ethereum - YouTube
December 19, 2018 Bitcoin Rallies Towards 4k - Why? Ethereum Launches ProgPoW GPU Mining Testnet | New HD Minable Coin - YouTube
January 4, 2019 Ethereum moving to PROGPOW! What’s it mean for Miners? - YouTube
January 4, 2019 Ethereum ProgPoW CONFIRMED! - YouTube
January 5, 2019 Mining on the ProgPoW Gangnam Ethereum Testnet! - YouTube
January 6, 2019 6 x Asus RX 570 4GB ProgPoW Gangnam Ethereum Testnet TEST! - YouTube
January 7, 2019 ProgPOW Explained - A Brave New World for Ethereum Miners? - YouTube
January 20, 2019 CES2019 - North American Bitcoin Conference - GRIN / BEAM - PROGPOW and more! - YouTube
January 23, 2019 Ethereum to ZERO? Eth Chain Split. ProgPow & ETC 51 % Attack. GPU vs ASIC Miners. - YouTube
January 29, 2019 Nick Johnson: Future of the Ethereum Name Service and thoughts on ProgPOW - YouTube
February 19, 2019 Ethereum Hard Fork Soon? ProgPoW Voting? - YouTube
February 20, 2019 ProgPoW Merged Into Parity Ethereum | ETHNews Brief - YouTube
February 25, 2019 How does R7 370, R9 380,380x,390 and more perform on PROGPOW and other Cryptocurrencies in 2019? - YouTube
March 7, 2019 PROGPOW Explained in under 4 min. & why it matters to GPU Miners - YouTube
March 19, 2019 What is BBT doing with PROGPOW, Why all of the testing? - YouTube
March 25, 2019 eVGA RTX 2080Ti FTW3 11GB DDR6 Cryptocurrency Performance Test PROGPOW ETH RVN BEAM GRIN29 GRIN31 - YouTube
March 29, 2019 Ethereum & ProgPoW… What Is Going On? - YouTube
May 2, 2019 Ethereum ProgPow Audit Has Been Funded & Approved - YouTube
July 5, 2019 Mining News! Monero RandomX | Ethereum ProgPoW 2019 Update | Grin Embraces ASIC miners | Zel Zelhash - YouTube
July 24, 2019 Ethereum ProgPoW AUDIT Is Finally Getting Started… - YouTube
September 13, 2019 Ethereum ProgPoW Algorithm Audits Finalized - YouTube
September 24, 2019 An Argument Against ProgPoW a Day - Part 1 - YouTube
October 4, 2019 82 - Defending ProgPoW with Kristy-Leigh Minehan - YouTube
October 10, 2019 #36 - Kristy-Leigh of ProgPow discusses the EIP, Satoshi, Code Contributions, and Crypto Mining 2020 - YouTube
November 24, 2019 Ethereum Classic REJECTS ProgPoW… - YouTube
December 16, 2019 Ethereum ProgPoW Implementation Is STILL Coming Right? - YouTube
December 26, 2019 Panel: Least Authority’s ProgPoW Audit (Devcon5) - YouTube

Podcasts

April 11, 2019 https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/blockchannel/id1307284590?i=1000434669782
September 10, 2019 https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/ethhub-weekly-recap-78-ethboston-compound-drama-eth2/id1443920565?i=1000449269536
September 25, 2019 https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/ethhub-weekly-recap-80-progpow-discussion-doj-extortion/id1443920565?i=1000451214746
October 4, 2019 https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/82-defending-progpow-with-kristy-leigh-minehan/id1436674724?i=1000452312677

Official Updates

May 18, 2019 Dev Call #38 - May 18, 2018
August 24, 2018 Dev Call #45 - August 24, 2018
September 28, 2018 Dev Call #47 - September 28, 2018
January 4, 2019 Dev Call #52 - January 4, 2019
January 18, 2019 Dev Call#53 - January 18, 2019
February 1, 2019 Dev Call #54 - February 1, 2019
February 11, 2019 Ethereum Cat Herders Update#1 : EthereumCatHerders
March 15, 2019 Dev Call #57 - March 15, 2019
May 24, 2019 Dev Call #62 - May 24, 2019
July 18, 2019 Dev Call #65 - July 18, 2019
September 10, 2019 ProgPoW Audits Released - Ethereum Cat Herders - Medium
September 6, 2019 Dev Call #70 - September 6, 2019
November 1, 2019 Dev Call #74 - November 1, 2019
December 13, 2019 Dev Call #77 - December 13, 2019
January 24, 2019 Dev Call #79 - January 24, 2020
February 21, 2020 Dev Call#81 - February 21, 2020

News Articles

January 4, 2019 Ethereum Core Devs to Move Forward With ASIC-Resistant PoW Algorithm
January 5, 2019 Ethereum (ETH) Developers Plan to Implement ASIC-Resistant Proof of Work Mining Algorithm
January 7, 2019 BREAKING: Ethereum Classic (ETC) Hit With 51 Percent Attack A Week Before Ethereum (ETH) Constantinople Hard Fork – Crypto.IQ | Bitcoin and Investment News from Inside Experts You Can Trust
January 8, 2019 ETH Dev Suggests Moving to ‘ASIC-Friendly Algorithm’ After ProgPoW Decision
January 8, 2019 Ethereum Miner Linzhi Calls Out Project Coders for Proposed ASIC Ban - CoinDesk
January 8, 2019 Ethereum (ETH) Core Developers Propose an ASIC Resistant Upgrade - Ethereum World News
January 9, 2019 Ethereum Classic (ETC) 51% attack proof that shitcoins have no hope of succeeding? | CaptainAltcoin
January 9, 2019 What’s ProgPoW? Meet the hot new debate in the Ethereum community | finder.com.au
January 18, 2019 Ethereum Core Devs Constantinople Meeting to Be Held on Jan 18
February 1, 2019 Ethereum Core Dev Call #54: Waiting for ProgPoW - The Block
February 3, 2019 Will Ethereum Adopt ‘ProgPoW,’ the ASIC-Resistant Mining Algorithm? | CryptoSlate
February 4, 2019 Is Ethereum Going to be Adopting ASIC-Resistant ‘ProgPow’ as a Mining Algorithm?
February 15, 2019 Ethereum Core Dev Call #55: ProgPoW audits and Vitalik’s Phase 2 updates - The Block
February 15, 2019 Recompensas por minería en Ethereum llegan a mínimo histórico | CriptoNoticias
February 28, 2019 Coinhive dice adiós a la minería web por caída del mercado | CriptoNoticias
March 6, 2019 Ethereum Core Dev Meeting : ProgPow Implementation Receives More Than 50 Percent Votes from Miners - CryptoNewsZ
March 7, 2019 The ASIC Resistant Mining Campaign from Ethereum Miners Is Just Getting Started
March 12, 2019 Ethereum’s ProgPoW Proposal: An Expensive Game of Whack-a-Mole - CoinDesk
March 12, 2019 Ethereum’s ProgPoW Mining Change to Be Considered for Istanbul Upgrade - CoinDesk
March 14, 2019 As ProgPoW Aimed at Stopping ASIC Mining Gets Supporting Votes, New Conspiracies and Debates Appear
March 15, 2019 Ethereum’s ProgPow Mining Change Approved Again, But Timeline Unclear - CoinDesk
March 17, 2019 Ethereum Devs Once Again Approve ASIC-Resistant Algorithm ProgPoW
March 18, 2019 Ethereum (ETH) to Be ASIC-Resistant, No Date Set However - Cryptovest
March 27, 2019 Aumentan desacuerdos en Ethereum por decisión de avanzar con ProgPoW | CriptoNoticias
March 29, 2019 Bitmain Co-founder, Jihan Wu: ASIC Miners Makes a Blockchain Network More Decentralized - Coindoo
April 8, 2019 A Fight Over Specialized Chips Threatens an Ethereum Split | WIRED
April 26, 2019 Funding Approved for Audit of Ethereum’s ProgPoW Mining Proposal - CoinDesk
April 28, 2019 Ethereum Core Devs: Funding for ProgPoW 3rd-Party Audit Approved
April 20, 2019 Ethereum’s Recent Decline in Hashrate ‘Not Surprising’: Cyber Threat Expert Explains | CryptoGlobe
June 14, 2019 Proposed Ethereum Istanbul Hard Fork Combed With A Fine Tooth at Cat Herders Meeting
July 13, 2019 ¿Qué es ProgPoW? La propuesta de algoritmo contra mineros ASIC en Ethereum | CriptoNoticias
August 17, 2019 Ethereum: ProgPow will be activated on the mainnet next year as a part of Istanbul 2 - AMBCrypto
August 18, 2019 Ethereum’s ProgPoW To Be Released The First Quarter Of 2020 | UseTheBitcoin
August 19, 2019 Ethereum to Switch to ProgPoW Mining Algorithm in Upcoming Istanbul Hard Fork
September 8, 2019 Ethereum: ProgPoW high level design goals are reasonable towards achieving its intended economic effect - AMBCrypto
September 11, 2019 Chinese Firm Linzhi Set To Mass Produce Ethereum and ETC ASIC Miners As Tests Go Live
September 18, 2019 Ethereum ProgPOW author uninvited from ETC Summit due to Craig Wright association | CryptoSlate
September 19, 2019 Ethereum reveals launch dates for testing Istanbul - Decrypt
September 19, 2019 Hashing Out: ProgPoW Debate Kicks Up in Ethereum Community Again
September 19, 2019 ETC Summit Invitees List Has No Space for Kristy Minehan
September 22, 2019 Ethereum ProgPoW upgrade causing chain split more likely to be from the user side instead of the miner side - AMBCrypto
September 23, 2019 ProgPow advocate uninvited to Ethereum Classic Summit over links to Craig Wright
September 24, 2019 ProgPoW backer steps down from controversial role - Decrypt
September 25, 2019 ProgPOW author steps down as Core Scientific CTO, vows to implement algorithm on Ethereum | CryptoSlate
September 25, 2019 Ethereum ProgPoW proponent Kristy-Leigh Minehan steps down citing perceived conflict of interest - AMBCrypto
September 25, 2019 Core Scientific CTO Steps Down To Push Through Ethereum ProgPOW
September 25, 2019 ProgPoW author Kristy-Leigh Minehan resigns as CTO of Core Scientific | Cryptopolitan
September 26, 2019 New Ethereum ASIC dominates GPU mining performance | CryptoSlate
September 26, 2019 New Ethereum ASIC Fuels Discord Among Ethereum Community
September 28, 2019 The (alleged) plot against the Ethereum network - Decrypt
October 9, 2019 ProgPoW, the Algorithm Dividing the Ethereum Community: a GPU Manufacturer Ploy? - Ethereum World News
October 9, 2019 Ethereum Hard Fork Is Coming — Here’s What You Need to Know About ‘Istanbul’ – BeInCrypto October 27, 2019 Ethereum ProgPoW’s raison d’etre: To be or not to be - AMBCrypto
November 4, 2019 Aragon Opposes Change to Ethereum’s Mining Algorithm Before 2.0 Version
November 7, 2019 Aragon community against Ethereum ProgPOW
November 8, 2019 Ethereum Istanbul Hard Fork Release Date Confirmed By Core Developer
November 16, 2019 Ethereum ProgPoW audit contributors on Gitcoin to be refunded in full - AMBCrypto
November 26, 2019 Ethereum’s Buterin: PoW algorithms offering medium-level ASIC resistance can be created - AMBCrypto
December 17, 2019 Ethereum devs move ProgPoW into ‘Eligible for Inclusion’ list - AMBCrypto
January 1, 2020 [Is the ASIC Resistance dream closer to reality, despite claims of it being a myth? - AMBCrypto](https://eng.ambcrypto.com/is-the-asic-resistance-dream-closer-to-reality-despite-claims-of-it-being-a-myth/
submitted by greerso to ethereum [link] [comments]

ZOTAC GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Unstable

I've had this card for a couple years. I bought it used off ebay for cheap.
I used to slightly overclock the card without issues when I first got it, but since I started playing a couple games again it crashes without an underclock. After playing around with Firestorm I found I have to underclock it by about -200 MHz on GPU and about -900 MHz Memory to get the card stable, this is nearly all it will allow on the sliders. If I don't, on benchmark tests it freezes up or artifacts if I don't do enough Memory underclock. Games run for some time then eventually crash or freeze if I don't...underclocked has no issues.
Any idea what may be causing this, card just dying? I'm sure it was used for bitcoin mining originally so that wouldn't shock me.
submitted by bka1 to graphicscard [link] [comments]

How much noise is worth one Bitcoin?

Just a musing from today's tampering with NVIDIA RTX Voice tech using GPU power to noise cancel.
It might not be what God intended, but it's definitely cool.
The same could be said about Crypto mining, if you're a lunatic.
So then the question is: How much noise is worth one bitcoin?
How many hours of screaming baby in the other room, or fan blowing on your headset would equate to a single bitcoin worth of power consumption?
Looks like this is a good place to start finding the answer, since these numbers seem to check out: https://www.thebalance.com/how-much-power-does-the-bitcoin-network-use-391280
Looks like it maths out to.. approximately 72 Terawatts (72,000,000,000 Kilowatts) to mine a single bitcoin, as of April 22nd, 2020.
And then there's RTX Voice, which uses.. 30 watts of power per second, steady it seems. https://www.techpowerup.com/review/nvidia-rtx-voice-real-life-test-performance-benchmark/4.html *Note*, the power cost of RTX Voice INCLUDES the cost of engaging the tensor cores at non-throttled clock speeds, so going from totally idle and throttled to unthrottled with RTX Voice is 30 watts of power per second. It would probably be less versus a non-idle, properly spun up GPU.. while gaming or something, but given that RTX Voice is a 8-10% performance hit on even the top end cards right now, It's probably still a hefty sum.
Anyway, that would come to 108kw/h.
Then to find out how many hours of voice per bitcoin, we should do.. 72000000000 (KW per bitcoin) divided by 108 (voice cost per hour)
And our answer is.. 666,666,666.666 hours of jackhammer finger smashing mechanical keyboard noise cancellation to mine one bitcoin.
Yes, that's the actual number. Does that math out?
Bonus question: How many joules of noise energy is required to mine a bitcoin?
submitted by Maergoth to AskTechnology [link] [comments]

Need help with a first time build

PCPartPicker Part List
Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 7 2700X 3.7 GHz 8-Core Processor $169.99 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Cooler Master Hyper 212 Black Edition 42 CFM CPU Cooler $29.99 @ Newegg
Motherboard ASRock B450 Pro4 ATX AM4 Motherboard $79.99 @ Newegg
Memory Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $77.98 @ Amazon
Storage Samsung 860 Evo 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive $148.91 @ Amazon
Video Card Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8 GB WINDFORCE OC 3X Video Card $499.99 @ B&H
Case Fractal Design Meshify C ATX Mid Tower Case $89.99 @ Newegg
Power Supply EVGA BQ 600 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $61.98 @ Newegg
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Pro OEM 64-bit $139.99 @ Other World Computing
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $1323.81
Mail-in rebates -$25.00
Total $1298.81
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-02-14 20:20 EST-0500
So that's what I have so far. I don't really know what I'm doing, I'm just sort of picking things based on price and reviews. I haven't paid attention to PC parts since the bitcoin mining drove gpu prices way up, so I have no idea what the benchmarks for the 2000 series are, I assume the 2070 super is probably pretty good.
I mostly just want to be able to run anything at max settings 1080p 60fps, while not having to upgrade much (if at all) for at least a couple years.
My main concerns with this build right now is whether or not I'm undeover paying for certain parts, or if certain parts are inadequate or bottlenecking the performance of others. Also, tips on other parts I may still need (excluding monitors/k+m). Being able to cut costs on stuff I don't need would great.

Thanks in advance!
submitted by ItsMeRyanHowAreU to buildapc [link] [comments]

[Question] Building first PC - Need some advice

Hey, I was hoping to get some advice. This will be the first computer I'll potentially build and I want to make sure I'm not making any mistakes here.
I basically went on PC Parts Picker after reading a bunch of reviews and articles and tried to put a computer together, I have no idea what I'm doing, I essentially followed advice from reviews and chose highest rated components while trying to be as cheap as possible. It turned out to be 2 grand which is pretty rough. If someone wouldn't mind taking a look at the list and letting me know if there's any substitutions I can make to lower the price, that would be aces.
PCPartPicker Part List
Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $464.00 @ Shopping Express
Motherboard ASRock X570 Phantom Gaming 4 ATX AM4 Motherboard $240.90 @ Newegg Australia
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $141.90 @ Newegg Australia
Storage Samsung 970 Evo 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $146.66 @ Amazon Australia
Storage *Seagate Barracuda Compute 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $77.00 @ Shopping Express
Video Card Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8 GB WINDFORCE OC 3X Video Card $795.00 @ Shopping Express
Case Phanteks P300 ATX Mid Tower Case $89.00 @ PCCaseGear
Power Supply Thermaltake DPS G RGB 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $149.00 @ Shopping Express
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $2103.46
*Lowest price parts chosen from parametric criteria
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-02-20 14:58 AEDT+1100
How sketchy are second hand parts? I read that people use gpus to mine bitcoins and stuff which is no bueno for the gpu then sell them but is there anything to kinda lookout for or is it all just random?
Some of my concerns regarding the build are
Cooling, from what I've read the included stock cooler with the Ryzen 7 3700x is pretty decent. I'm not really looking to overclock the CPU but is there any detriment to the life of the CPU over time by not having better cooling?
X570 motherboards, I read something along the lines of with the new generation of Ryzen CPUs there may be some BIOS issues with older X-whatever motherboards and you'll need an older CPU to be able to boot and update the BIOS. So the 570 is the safest bet. I'm trying to save money where ever I can so is there maybe an older motherboard that is 1000000% known to work with a ryzen 7 3700x?
2070 super, how super is it? It was only 100ish more than the 2070 but I don't really understand what it means in terms of real world performance, I saw a lot of graphs with benchmarks but how worth it is the super over the regular 2070?
How does RAM overall contribute to your computer? What would be the advantage of 16 vs 8gb in terms of real performance that you notice? Is it better to split the ram into more sticks and use all the slots on the motherboard?
Any advice would be much appreciated, thanks for taking the time.
submitted by -classic-blue- to buildapcforme [link] [comments]

[EasyBTC] Web based mining control with profitability switching (2020 supported)

EasyBTC - program for automatic mining Main idea 1. Monitoring mining pools in real time. 2. Support most algorithms 3. Working with pools that have auto exchange for bitcoin 5. Monitoring the status of video cards. 6. Automatic switching of miners for profitability 7. Automatic switching of MSIAfterburner profiles. 8. Simple interface and setup. 9. Built-in benchmark algorithms.
Mining fee consists not only from electricity, but mostly from administrative tasks. You should monitor cryptocurrency prices, difficulty, exchange currencies. If you have several rigs with different series GPUs, it becomes hard work. Especially if your want to control rigs remotely.
EasyMiner try to cover all this questions. It would be useful as for newbie miners with couple GPUs, as experienced miners with multiple rigs. DOWNLOAD AND START
Features
-Easy install. No need to find mining software, create wallets for each cryptocurrency, exchange cryptocurrency. You need just download and install app.
-Web basedcontrol center. You can control all your miners from one point.
-Auto switch miners. Mining Agent continuously checks exchange rates and difficulty of cryptocurrencies and switches to most profitable. For now, EasyMiner supports switching between Ethereum and ZCash. Tell me currencies you need. I will add them.
-Per GPU benchmarks and mining. If you have rig with different series of GPUs, Agent will load each GPU with most profitable algorithm.
-BTC payouts. All your mined coins will be exchanged to Bitcoin and transferred to your wallet.
-Detailed stats. You may see all your stats at Dashboard.
- Supports failover.
-Displays detailed mining information and hashrate for every card.
-Supports GPU selection, built-in GPU overclocking features and temperature management.
Requirements
- Windows 10x64
- Nvidia GPUs 10xx series
- At least 4Gb RAM (Depends on miner)

Pools:
NiceHash AhashPool ZergPool MultiPoolHub
MiningRigRentals ZPool BlazePool BlockMasters
I recommend nice and zerg, both basic and zpool in addition.
Coming Soon
- SMS alert
- Mobile app
submitted by TriangleGeorge to altcoins [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Rhodium Mining Guide

Bitcoin Rhodium Mining Guide
Happy Mining!

All available XRC pools can be found on MiningPoolStats

Bitcoin Rhodium Mining Hardware

Baikal Giant+: 1.6 GH/s
Baikal Quad Cube: 1.2 GH/s
Baikal Giant: 900 MH/s
Baikal Quadruple Mini Miner: 600 MH/s
Baikal Miner Cube: 300 MH/s
Baikal Mini Miner: 150 MH/s

Mining Setup

To mine Bitcoin Rhodium you need to set up an XRC wallet and configure your miner of choice. You can choose between Web wallet, Electrum-XRC or Magnum wallet. To set up a web wallet please visit wallet.bitcoinrh.org. Or download and install Electrum-XRC wallet (recommended) for Windows, Linux and MacOS.
Web wallet: wallet.bitcoinrh.org
Electrum-XRC wallet: electrum.bitcoinrh.org
Magnum wallet: https://magnumwallet.co

Sign up for XRC web wallet if not yet done so

  1. Create an account, with your username, password and secure question.
  2. Sign in and click “Create Wallet”.
  3. Set up a strong transaction password. Make sure you store it securely in a secure password manager of choice.
  4. Copy the seed somewhere safe. It’d be a good idea to write seed on a hardcopy and keep it safe.
  5. Paste it to confirm you got it right.
  6. Grab an address for the mining step. Your wallet is now ready to mine XRC.

Instructions for mining XRC on the official pool

Pool link: poolcore.bitcoinrh.org
  1. Any miner that supports X13 will be able to mine XRC. We have a few examples below of miners that are well tested with Bitcoin Rhodium network.
  2. For any miner, configure the miner to point to:
(0–0.8 GH/s) stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3061
(0.8–2 GH/s) stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3062
(3–4 GH/s) stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3063
(5+ GH/s) stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3064
with your XRC address as username and x as password. You don’t need to open an account on pool. You will be mining to XRC address and mined coins will be transferred to your wallet
after blocks reach 10 block maturity
after you mined up minimal amount of coins (currently 0.1 XRC)
sometimes mined blocks could get rejected by network (orphaned) after they were counted as valid blocks. This is normal network behavior to follow longest chain
  1. http://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org is used to follow your miner and network statistics.

CPU Miner-Multi

Source: https://github.com/tpruvot/cpuminer-multi
Sample configuration with CPU Miner tested on UBUNTU.
{
“url” : “stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3061”, “user” : “YOUR XRC ADDRESS”,
“pass” : “x”,
“algo” : “x13”, “threads” : 1,
“cpu-priority” : 5,
“cpu-affinity” : 1, “benchmark” : false, “debug” : true, “protocol”: true, “show-diff”: true, “quiet” : false
}
Command to run your CPUMiner: cpuminer -c cpuminer.json

SGMiner (ATI GPU)

SGMiner is a GPU-based mine: https://github.com/nicehash/sgminereleases
The configuration below was tested on Windows:
setx GPU_FORCE_64BIT_PTR 0
setx GPU_MAX_HEAP_SIZE 100
setx GPU_USE_SYNC_OBJECTS 1
setx GPU_MAX_ALLOC_PERCENT 100
setx GPU_SINGLE_ALLOC_PERCENT 100
cd C:\Software\sgminer-5.6.1-nicehash-51-windowsamd64 sgminer.exe
— gpu-platform 1 — algorithm x13mod -url stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh. org:3062 — pool-user — userpass :x — auto-fan — temp-target 70 — temp-over- heat 82 — temp-cutoff 85 — gpu-fan 65–85 — log-file log.txt — no-adl — no-extra- nonce -P –T

CCMiner (NVIDIA GPU)

CCMiner is a GPU-based miner (NVIDIA)
Command to run your CCMINER:
ccminer-x64.exe -a x13 -o stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3062 -O :without -D — show-diff

Baikal miner

Settings: Url:
(0–2 GH/s) stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3062
(3–4 GH/s) stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3063
(5+ GH/s) stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3064
Algo: x13User: your XRC receiving address (make sure you set 2 distinct addresses for each hashing board)
Pass: x
Extranonce: leave off Priority set to 0 and 1
Once pool stratum address and your wallet as user are set up you should see your miner mining against XRC pool. When miner is working the status column is green. The pool and miner are incorrectly configured now as status says “Dead” highlighted in red.

Instructions for mining XRC on BSOD pool

Pool link: bsod.pw/en/pool/dashboard/XRC/
Use this code for your miner: -a x13 -o stratum+tcp://pool.bsod.pw:2582 -u WALLET.rig
BSOD pool allows both solo and party mining.
For solo mining use code: -a x13 -o stratum+tcp://pool.bsod.pw:2582 -u WALLET.rig -p m=solo And for party mining use: -a x13 -o stratum+tcp://pool.bsod.pw:2582 -u WALLET.rig -p m=party.yourpassword
NOTICE: You can use us for North America and asia for Asia instead of euin your .bat file or config.
You can also use BSOD pool’s monitor app for Android and iOS.

Instructions for mining XRC on ZERGPOOL

Zergpool offers low fees (just 0.5%) and also SOLO and PARTY mining with no extra fees.
To mine XRC on Zergpool use this command lines for your miner:
Regular: -a x13 -o stratum+tcp://x13.mine.zergpool.com:3633 -u -p c=XRC,mc=XRC Solo: -a x13 -o stratum+tcp://x13.mine.zergpool.com:3633 -u -p c=XRC,mc=XRC,m=solo Party: -a x13 -o stratum+tcp://x13.mine.zergpool.com:3633 -u -p c=XRC,mc=XRC,m=party
Use your coin wallet address as username in mining software. Specify c=SYMBOL as password to identify payout wallet coin, and the same coin in mc=SYMBOL to specify mining coin.
For more information and support please visit http://zergpool.com
Notice that when there are more pools mining XRC in different geographic/availability locations choose the nearest to you as lowest priority and then add desirable fall back pool options in different geographic locations or pools. This is useful when one pool experiences issues, to fall back to different pool in Bitcoin Rhodium network.

Calculate your Bitcoin Rhodium mining profitability

WhatToMine: https://whattomine.com/coins/317-xrc-x13
CoinCalculators: https://www.coincalculators.io/coin/bitcoin-rhodium

Feel free to ask questions in Discord community. There are lots of helpful people around the world watching XRC 24x7.

Bitcoin Rhodium Dev Team
submitted by BitcoinRh to BitcoinRhodium [link] [comments]

Why is the RandomX algorithm being hyped to the moon?

TL;DR: don't assume the average return from mining RandomX will be higher than the current CryptonightR algorithm. Hold back your excitement for now.
I think we all need to bring something to our attention. Over the last month, there have been so many topics and comments here on MoneroMining about the new 'RandomX' algorithm. This algorithm is supposed to be launched a couple of months from now.
There are many questions like "is this a good hashrate for my CPU"? "What's your power usage on RandomX"? "How can I tune my CPU for RandomX"? "How would the algorithm perform on this hardware"? I think these are great constructive comments that are at the heart of what miners stand for. We miners love optimizing our rigs and educating ourselves on technological trends.
But I've noticed many questions such as "what parts should I buy for a RandomX mining rig"? "Is an AMD Ryzen 9 3900x a good investment"? "What parts will give me the most profit when RandomX launches"? Many of these questions are asked with very little research.
I think there's a gold fever brewing behind some of these comments. The kind of motives that have bankrupted many miners in the past bubbles.
As we have seen in 2014 and 2018, anybody who enters the crypto industry with an 'I want easy profit' attitude almost always goes bankrupt. They buy coins or hardware at the peak of the bubble. Sometimes they get lucky and sell their coins or rigs right before the crash (only to get burned in a future bubble later). But most of the time, these new users lose most of their investment.
As a veteran miner, a lot of alarm bells ring in my head when I read these kinds of RandomX hype posts.
I have no reason to think CPU mining will be more profitable on RandomX than on the current CryptonightR.
In the GPU mining community, I have the feeling that there's a lot of resentment over the 2018 crypto recession and the whole 'ASIC miner invasion'. I think people here are feeling burned over their losses last year and the evil ASIC takeover, and want an opportunity for the little guy to start mining again. So we're falsely seeing the RandomX ray of hope as a floodlight, and getting overexcited.
And in general, the ordinary person cannot make a significant, steady profit in the crypto mining industry. The guy who wrote that thread is very rich and even 100 GTX 1080 Ti's cost nothing to him. The reason he became wealthy is because he avoided get-rich-quick gimmicks back in the day (like the dotcom sites) and focused on learning technology for the future. Mining will not make you rich, and especially not RandomX coin tossing.
If you love RandomX, build your rig now, keep benchmarking and undervolting and have fun at it. But if you just want profit, wait until RandomX is up and running. And consider all the risks involved with a new algorithm and commercial mining in general.
So I hope we can all reconsider whether we're excited about RandomX for the right reasons. Let's try to avoid jumping to conclusions about profitability and hold off on the Newegg 'checkout' button. Even though 12 cores at 70 watts sounds awesome. Happy mining!
submitted by Hammereditor to MoneroMining [link] [comments]

Debunking myths about mining and GPUs

E: Going to bed, will contribute more tomorrow. Thanks for the discussion!
Myth: Mining is more stressful than gaming. Fact: It depends. During the old days, this was plausible, because older GPUs (Pre-polaris) are/were bottlenecked by core clock when mining the most profitable coins. Thus, miners overclocked and overvolted these cards quite frequently, especially with cheap electricity. This meant that those cards were often run hot, pushing the limits and stressing VRM and fans quite a lot. Nowadays, ethash (Ethereum) is the most profitable algorithm for AMD cards 99% of the time, and newer GPUs (Polaris) are limited by memory bandwidth and latency. Miners can underclock core to the low 1100MHz range before seeing performance drop. To save power, miners who know what they are doing also undervolt, since it is no longer necessary to sustain a high core clock. Thus, it is quite feasible to run polaris cards below 70C at a reasonable fan speed. However, dual mining (mining more than one coin at once) does increase power consumption by up to 20%, and there are also idiots who run their polaris cards OCd while mining. With the exception of a few idiots, miners treat their Polaris GPUs pretty much the same; that is, running underclocked and undervolted 24/7 with a memory strap mod and mem OC. On the other hand, former gaming cards are highly variable in use cases. Some gamers leave their cards at stock settings, some undervolt, and some OC and/or overvolt. Most of the time, these cards are thermal cycled far more often than mining cards, which is known to weaken solder. Another thing to consider is that manufacturers have learned (somewhat) from their mistakes of putting shit tier fans in GPUs, and many fans on modern GPUs are ball bearing and/or swappable. Even some budget cards, such as MSI Armor, use decent ball bearing fans. Bottom line: the risk of buying mined Polaris cards is not as high as the risk of buying older mined cards. I would not be against buying mined polaris cards, but it's not necessarily better than buying a gamer's card instead. At the end of the day, it depends more on how the owner treated it than what they used it for.
Myth: GPUs are obsolete because of FPGAs and ASICs Fact: Mostly false. Older algorithms such as scrypt and SHA256 (lite/doge/feathebitcoin etc) are no longer feasible to mine with GPUs, but there have been multiple algorithms since then that are built to deter ASICs; most of the time it is done by making it memory-hard because designing an ASIC with high memory throughput is considerably more expensive to design and manufacture. Many devs prefer their blockchain to be ASIC resistant to avoid the concentration of power problem that Bitcoin is having nowadays, where a giant, near-monopolistic ASIC manufacturer (Bitmain) is causing a lot of (subjective) controversy. Blockchains based on ethash (Ethereum and its forks), equihash (Zcash and its forks) and cryptonight (Monero and forks) are some examples, but there are scores of other shitcoins and a few other algos that are GPU dominant. It is almost impossible that there will be another ASIC takeover, which is what was responsible for the stop in GPU demand in the bitcoin and litecoin days. Bottom line: ASICs no longer threaten GPU miners, or the demand for GPUs
Myth: Ethereum switching to Proof of Stake will kill mining soon Fact: Doomsayers have been preaching about proof of stake since late 2015. It has always been "coming soon." The fact is, the Ethereum roadmap goes from proof of work (mining) -> Casper (mining + PoS) -> Metropolis (PoS). Currently, the release date of Casper is not even announced yet, nor is it being tested in a (public) testnet. Proof of Stake might one day take over, but mining is here to stay for a while yet. Another thing to consider is that there are tons of other GPU mineable blockchains, and although Ethereum is biggest, it is certainly feasible that mining stays profitable even after Ethereum goes PoS (if it ever does). However, it is possible that profits will be low enough to discourage new miners. Bottom line: It's very unlikely. E: I screwed up the roadmap; here is a better source than me with some interesting information: https://www.ethnews.com/ethereums-vitalik-buterin-gives-keynote-on-metropolis
Myth: The current Ethereum demand spike is a bubble Opinion: Honestly, I don't know. I would not be surprised if stricter regulations on ICOs come sooner or later, which would fuck with Ether prices. There is also the inherent volatility of cryptocurrencies. However, it is also possible that blockchain technology continues to gain traction; that is, the price could just as easily go up as go down. Although it's fun to read about other people's opinions, only time-travelling wizards can tell you when it will become economical again to upgrade your poor HD5770. Bottom line: No one knows.
Myth: Miners will "steal" all the RX Vegas Fact: Only a reckless miner would buy Vegas on release, since mining performance is not known. In fact, it is possible that it can't mine at all (or at some stupidly low speed) until devs add support to existing miners. It would be even more reckless than gamers who buy without seeing benchmarks, since at least gamers can expect the games to actually run. It's also not necessarily the case that Vega will be good once miners do add support. Maybe there will be enough reckless miners to affect supply, maybe not. Of course, it is possible that miners will deplete the supply after it is demonstrated that Vega is good for mining. Bottom line: Most miners won't preorder, but it's possible that a significant number will. E: Important to remember that even if mining demand isn't high, doesn't mean that supply will be plentiful.
Myth: Nvidia cards SUCK at mining Fact: Mostly false. They USED to suck in the old pre-Maxwell days, but now they are actually more efficient at mining Ethereum and Zcash compared to AMD cards, even after both cards are undervolted. The flipside is that they (used to) cost more for the equivalent hashrate. For reference, my old 5xRX470 rig drew just under 800W when mining ETH only and hashed at 150MH/s. My current 6xGTX1060 rig draws just over half of that (<450W) and hashes at about 135MH/s. Certainly not as good in raw performance, but they are viable nonetheless, especially given the AMD GPU shortage. In fact, Nvidia cards (1060 and especially 1070) are becoming scarce as well. Bottom line: Nvidia is still the underdog when it comes to mining, but far from irrelevant nowadays.
Myth: 4GB cards will be obsolete for mining soon Fact: FALSE. The Ethereum DAG is not even 3GB yet, and won't be for a few months. The recent reports of 4GB Polaris cards slowing down soon due to DAG size is caused by limited TLB capacity, not VRAM restrictions. Polaris cards will still be able to mine ETH forks such as Expanse and UBIQ without diminished speed, and even if they are used to mine ETH, it is not that much of a performance hit at first. It would certainly not make polaris useless or undesirable for mining anytime soon. Tahiti GPUs already suffer from this issue and Hawaii is the most resistant to this issue. Have not benched Nvidia at a later epoch.
Myth: Creating miner-bashing posts on Reddit will help alleviate the GPU supply problem Fact: False, you are simply giving cryptocurrencies and mining more exposure to the general public, increasing demand.
Myth: Mining-specific GPUs will solve the shortage problems Opinion: There's not enough info to tell yet, but I am a skeptic for the following reasons. First, no display limits the resale value of the card for obvious reasons. IMO, the whole point of crypto mining from a profitability standpoint is to have a hedge against coin volatility (hardware is still worth something if the coin crashes). Otherwise it is much less effort to just buy and hold the coin. If the hardware is useless without demand from other (significant) sources, then it doesn't make much sense to buy it unless the price is extremely low. I'm sure that cost-downing the PCB and warranty will make for a cheap card, but it has to be extremely cheap and plentiful in supply, or else miners will buy whatever they can get. I could envision "failed" chips (not meeting spec of consumer editions) being stuck in miner cards, but I doubt there are enough to meet demand without ramping up production as a whole, which carries its own risks. I guess that it would help a little, but probably not solve the problems. Alternatively, since modern GPUs are bottlenecked by RAM when mining, it might be enticing to miners to have the fastest (GDDR5) RAM on the market (probably the 9gbps chips from the 1060 6G 9gbps edition, although I don't have one to test). However, my previous points still apply; buying such a card without display outputs carries a big risk. Bottom line: It's not a great idea, unless they are super cheap or use really good RAM.
Hope this helped; if you have any further questions I will try to answer them. I'm both a gamer and miner who uses both AMD and Nvidia roughly equally and don't favor one group over another. I've mined and gamed on all high end AMD GPUs since Tahiti (except Tonga) and all Pascal cards except 1050ti.
submitted by key_smash to Amd [link] [comments]

Thoughts on Helping BSG maintain a revenue. Allow us to allocate a percentage of our GPU to Bitcoin mining on behalf of BSG.

I don't exactly understand how bitcoin mining works, but i had the idea if there was a option to allocate X% of GPU while in raid, and X% of GPU while in menu we could collectively help BSG maintain a revenue while they work on their vision for the game. If there was a benchmark we could run, to show us our avg FPS in raid with whatever percentage of GPU we selected to use for mining. I don't know if this is even feasible but its an thought. I created a Poll to see if this is something you guys would be willing to do.
https://strawpoll.com/98wp45rz
submitted by 69Bandit to EscapefromTarkov [link] [comments]

The Xbox One X, Teraflops, and the GTX 1070

With the Xbox One X (Scorpio) on the horizon I've heard a lot of talk about teraflops and how the One X will perform the same as a 1070 because they are close in terms of teraflops. I'm going to try and shed some light on the subject.
First off, what is a teraflop? Well, it's a measure of floating point operations per second. Or in layman's terms "how fast a GPU can do math." So that means higher numbers are better, right? The higher the number the faster the device can add, subtract and multiply numbers.
Well not exactly. Teraflops are really only a good measurement of performance if you're only running complex math and doing nothing else (think bitcoin mining or physics simulations).
For example: The rx 480 has 5.8 Tflops and is a pretty capable GPU. However, the 980Ti only has 5.6 Tflops. Now wait a second. The 980Ti wrecks the 480 in any gaming benchmark. How come a GPU with a lower Teraflop rating can outperform one with a higher rating?
To quote EuroGamer:
Teraflops are a very basic measure of computational power, separate and distinct from all other aspects of GPU design.
Teraflops really have very little to do with gaming performance, because there are lots of other things that impact gaming performance (vRAM bandwidth, cache, etc).
In short, the Xbox One X probably won't perform on the same level as a 1070. The One X has 6 Tflops, but seeing how the 480/580 (which is very similar to the One X's GPU) stacks up against the 1070 we can't reasonably expect the One X to do much better.
*Edit: Of course the Xbox isn't out yet, so have really have no idea on how it performs until it gets in the hands of Digital Foundry (or similar channel) who has the ability to analyze it's performance in. And just to touch on Forza, the only it was running at 1080p60 on the OG One was with the dynamic resolution and settings. I suspect that will be implemented on the One X with Forza 7.
submitted by XtremeCookie to pcmasterrace [link] [comments]

[Free] [Guide] Kryptex BTC Miner! Best miner for beginners!

Kryptex is a perfect, lightweight bitcoin miner that I have used on and off over the past year now. I have only used it about a month in time total, accumulating over $30, and you can expect at least $30-$70 per month with a decent enough rig (https://i.imgur.com/LruixfG.png first and only withdraw of btc and my current balancehttps://i.imgur.com/qV8RWoX.png), last I had was $9 and I only remember running it for a couple days before turning it off and forgetting about it). I personally believe this is the best mining software for beginners or even novices, with such an easy setup that only takes minutes. Not to mention they have both a lite mode and and full mode depending on how hard you want your computer to run, or if you want to run the app in the background with games or videos. I have found it doesn't affect my system much if at all, and my specs are 16gb RAM, Ryzen 5 1600 and a 1060 6GB.
You're first brought into a benchmark after logging into your account (there is a warning about antiviruses producing false positives. https://i.imgur.com/6DEqB4l.png) but down below you can find an antivirus link with the full scan of the .exe. During the benchmark the program doesn't use much computer power, only about 10% cpu, <1000mb of ram and <5% GPU. Once the benchmark is you are free to check the app and see what it has to offer!
In the settings you're first greeted with an option for Starting with Windows and an option to enable or disable the use of the CPU. After that you are given a drop down that lets you choose the mode Kyrptex will run when on in the background, I recommend Lite Mode as it will be the best for your pc during use and you can leave the heavier loads for when your pc is sleeping or inactive. With only litemode you could expect anywhere from $5-$15 depending on your rig and load, I usually sit at about $7-$13 per month. You also have an advanced settings option giving you the option to disable/enable your cpus or gpus and which algorithms you'd like to use. From Dagger Hashimoto #1 & #2, CryptoNight, Cuckoo Cycle, X16R and their recently added Equihash 150, 5.
As a beginner miner, and someone who has tried only a few programs, my word of course isnt the best, but out of the select miners I've tried, I truly believe this is the best miner program, especially for beginners who are trying to test the waters out.
You can download Kryptex at https://www.kryptex.org/?ref=4e09fec3 (referral link) or https://www.kryptex.org/ (non-referral)
Mining Consoles and Program Interface: https://i.imgur.com/ibWpG1x.pngVirusTotal: https://www.virustotal.com/gui/file/4f75a40104c19c19f8921332f8cb125e89f6b4890e473ad5252889d6b07b0b14/detection It is flagged by 4 software, but I believe these to be false positives, even one of them saying it's detected due to it being a coin miner.
submitted by drabspirit to FreeStuff [link] [comments]

MiningPoolHub/AwesomeMiner/MultiMinningPool FAQ

Hello everyone,
As some of you have probably noticed I have been taking the time to try my best to help some of you answer some questions.
 
However there has been a lot of repeat questions lately so hopefully this will help. I will continue to update this as we go, please check back if you have any questions as I will try to update this frequently
 
 
If you have a question you do not see covered please feel free to comment and I'll add it and try to answer it. I have added a unresolved to the beginning of this FAQ. I will number them below. Please comment below with the answer, to help me identify which question you are answering please add. UR#(x) to your comment as well, with x being the number of the unresolved question.
 
 
Before we start I will get my disclaimer out of the way.
I do not work with/for any of the developers of these programs. I do not have all the answers. Some of these are my best guess, others may be wrong or may have a better solution than the one I give. Please feel free to correct me if this is the case and I will edit as we go.
 
 
Set-up
We have two text guides here by waffleflops one for awesome miner and one for multi mining pool.
We also have a YouTube video guide by razorseal
 
YouTube Video Guide: Here
Awesome Miner(AM): Text Tutorial
MultiPoolMiner(MPM): Text Tutorial
 
 
So which one should I use?
It seems like it depends on what you want from the program, Awesome Miner is more like Nicehash in the way it looks but can be a little more complicated. MPM is pretty simple but it has less customization for those not familiar with programming.
 
NX18: "I find MPM to be better. No stability issues, no funky windows service always running in the background, and it checks MPH for best coin to mine whereas AM checks whattomine.com and they differ significantly sometimes."
 
MPM also has a minimum dev fee of 10 minutes per day (even if you set donate to 0) whereas AM does not seem to have dev fees. Both I believe have fees included that go to the devs of the miner programs themselves. However these fees for the miner devs will be attached whether you use MPM/AM or solo miner with the miner dev programs anyway.
 
 
Unresolved Questions
 
1. Anyone have solutions on crashing or very low Hashrates in sgminers with AMD GPU's in Awesome Miner?
2. Why is Lyra2Z using only 40% power from my GPU (GTX980ti)? Where/how can it tweak the settings?
I believe this is having to do with Awesome Miner 3.I did not see it asked or posted but I am curious if there's a way to bench all gpus. Instead of selecting gpu 0 and benching, waiting until its done and moving on to gpu 1 and so on. I have 8 nvidia gpus, just wondering if there's a way to auto bench all of them in a row so I can walk away and go to bed, be done I'm the middle of the night.
 
 
General MPH Questions
 
1.Hashrate is not the same on my miner as it is on the dashboard?
From MPH: "Hashrate showing on site is just an estimated value. Pool doesn't know about miner very much. It just collects certain "shares" which is some piece of hash that satisfies certain conditions. So don't worry, it's all about probability thing. Your hashrate on site can go up and down time to time."
There is some luck involved when mining in pools it is like playing the lottery. NiceHash paid at a certain rate because you were not mining coins and getting paid you were getting paid for the hash you are providing.
 
2. Balances on MPH what are the brackets?
The brackets are coins that have not yet been confirmed enough times on the blockchain. Any coins not in brackets have been confirmed.
 
3. How long will it take for my coins to show up, transfer to and from the exchange, be credited to my auto exchange coin?
 
I have been seeing a lot of questions about this so I made a flowchart which you can view Here
 
Short Answer: It depends could be minutes could be days
Long Answer: It has to be exchanged first and then placed in auto-exchange balance balance.
So you mine coin
Coin credited but unconfirmed (this can take time depending on coin)
Coin is confirmed and credited for auto exchange.
Coin is then placed on exchange. So again has to be transferred and again has to be confirmed but on exchange side.
Coin is most likely converted into btc then into auto-exchange coin at exchange.
Then auto-exchange coin is sent back to your balance on mph. So again has to be confirmed before appearing.
Depending on how fast a coin is confirmed will depend on how fast it appears in your balance.
If you stopped mining today it your balance most likely continue to grow over time.
However if you continue to mine it should in theory catch up and you will see you balance grow at a semi if not expected rate.
 
Supplemental:Forgive me if I'm misunderstanding, but this should mean it changes column, not disappears from balance entirely, no?
You will not know exact balance until it is sent back over from the exchange. This is because of the fact that you are exchanging the coins against one another. If one coin is up and one is down you could be losing or gaining value depending on the situation. This is why it seems that coins on the exchange disappear without your auto-exchange coins balance going up right away. Reference question 8 for more info
 
4. What is the best coin to auto-exchange?
This depends, just remember BTC has high transaction fees and can take some time to confirm. You will want to have a good amount of BTC before moving to your wallet to minimize the amount you lose to transaction fees.
I personally use LTC, it is quick and transaction fees are low compared to BTC but can still be exchanged for fiat on coinbase.
At the time of writing this, if you move BTC from MPH you will be charged a $4.96 fee, if you move LTC the fee to move to your wallet is $0.19
 
5. Can I hold on to certain coins instead of auto-exchanging them?
Yes, just go to auto exchange on MPH and switch off the coin you do not want to auto exchange.
 
6. This dashboard sucks! Why do they not have a one page dashboard?
Good news it is in the works, improvements are on the way so no need to keep posting about it!
 
7. Why is my coin not being exchanged?
Two possible reasons A)On balances page it says "coins that don't have enough volume on exchange for a certain amount of time will not be auto exchanged to desired coin. These coins may be sent back as original coin or btc."
B)On auto-exchange page. Mph accumulates coins so that they can be efficiently converted at the exchange. If a coins pool has not mined a certain amount it will not be sent over until it reaches the set number. It seems like it is transferred over to the exchange as one large amount instead of small amounts.
 
8. AwesomeMiner said I was going to make $X.XX dollars and when auto-exchange coins came in I made less than it said!
Couple things, do not take to heart the exact number it gives you. It is not exact remember it is like a lottery.
Remember your coins at first will trickle in over time but the longer you mine it will begin to average out.
Remember you are exchanging coins for you auto-exchange coin this means if there is a decrease or increase between them you could gain more or less.
Example if you mine VTC and auto-exchange into LTC.
You send VTC to auto-exchange it will most likely be converted into BTC first. If BTC is having a good day that day and has increased in price by 30% and VTC has not grown well that day you will be trading your VTC at a loss.
Then this same situation will happen again when converting the BTC to LTC.
So again a bit of a lottery you may gain or lose some of your mined coins value depending on the exchange rate between the coins at the time.
 
9. Add more Cryptonight coins please.
They are apparently working on adding new coins like Electroneum.
 
10. Why can't I auto-exchange BTC?
My theory is that it is because BTC is not mined on MPH, remember the coins are sent to the exchange when they hit a certain amount in order to make it efficient. Because BTC is not mined on MPH it would not be efficient to exchange BTC to other coins once it has been credited to your account.
 
11. Do I need a wallet for each coin I mine? How do I set-up a wallet?
No, only the coin(s) you want to get paid in. Click on coins pool on MPH and you will see a wallet option Add the correct address for each coin you want to be paid in, note you cannot use another coins address or you risk losing your coins. For example you should not put your Bitcoin address into your Litecoin wallet address section.
 
12. My wallet address keeps on changing, do I need to keep updating my wallet address?
Take from Coinbase: This is done to protect your privacy, so that a third-party can not view all other transactions associated with your account simply by using a blockchain explorer to look-up an address they know to be yours.
All addresses that have been generated for your account will remain associated with your account forever. They are safe to re-use to receive future payments, but for the prior stated reasons, we recommend using a unique address for all transactions.
 
13.Is there a easy way I can track my Profits/Hashrate/Workers?
Yes credit to JaymZZZ Click Here
 
14. I click on manage wallet from the balances menu and enter my account number, I get the error saying Failed to update your account: Invalid coin address.
Make sure you are adding the address to the correct coin. A bitcoin address for example should only be added to the bitcoin wallet, it should not be added to any other wallet. (Reference question 11)
 
15. Is there a fee for auto-exchange?
Yes 0.2%
 
 
Awesome Miner
 
1. I do not want to mine that algo, I turn it off but it still mines it!
Go to online services, edit, change profit switching from yes to no
 
2. Why is it mining something less profitable?
Make sure you go to tools and then benchmark Make sure you right click and save hashrate occasionally it will improve your profit switching over time.
 
3. I can't get the miner to run?
Did you exclude it from anti-virus?
You may need to reinstall.
Uninstall
then in search bar type in %localappdata%\awesomeminer (delete this folder)
Type in %appdata% go to awesome miner folder and delete this one as well
Reinstall awesomeminer
Do not run aweseomminer
Go to anti-virus and exclude all folders with awesomeminer (including the ones in the local and appdata folders)
 
4. How do i delete a Miner?
samualsmash: https://i.imgur.com/SSr1rnH.png
 
5. Can I do anything to make improvements?
puch0021:You can use VertMiner (which is what is used by OCM) to increase your hash rate compared to AwesomeMiner's default CCminer. You have to choose it for Lyra instead of CC miner. See: http://www.awesomeminer.com/help/managedsoftware.aspx Download Vertminer and extract software. Go to awesomeminer's options -> managed software -> add new user defined mining software: Type in VertMiner for description, full compatibility mode, and compatible software as CCminer. Everything in the algorithm should be disabled expect Lyra2ReV2 which should be enabled. Double click in under defined command line argument and add lyra2v2 as text. Click ok. Go to profit profiles in awesome miner. Select nvidia GPU and edit. In the mining software list there should be a new VertMiner entry. Check this box to enable it. Then click configure and then under path click browse. Click local. Select the Vertminer folder you previously made. Now whenever lyra is called for, vertminer should be used. If you try to bench mark with this enabled, it will fail but it works for mining. You can then use your mining results to manually edit your profit profile value for Lyra2REv2 (that was otherwise has the old value for ccminer.) On my 1060 it went from 21 to 22.8. Keep in mind vertminer takes 2% dev fees but it still works out to be faster than cc miner. let me know if this was any help!
I used one click miners vertminer since it was already installed.
 
6. Whenever Awesome Miner starts on a new algo and opens new instances of the CLI miner application/s, the window steal the focus from whatever you're doing. Anyone else super annoyed by this? Anyone know of a way to prevent this?
Stop mining, click more, properties, environment, console window mode, hide window, start mining again.
 
 
MultiPoolMiner (MPM)
 
1. I see a yellow stripe wich says multipoolminer is between 7% and 17% more profitable, which is nice. under this strip I see 2 lines with miner, BTC and Euro. (in my case) which of those btc values end up on your miningpoolhub balance? or both?
NX18:" Neither. Those values are best guesses by that script, hence why beside the dollar figure it shows the +/- variance which sometimes is really high like 25%, meaning that scripts best guess could be wrong by that much"
It is showing the 2nd best, If it is not the best at the time it will not show that text and just give you the comparison.
 
2. It keeps say NiceHash API failed what should I do? You can ignore it or as chillfisch points out that you can just delete the nicehash folder to get rid of this warning.
 
 
Tips
Gator-Empire
BTC: 16pVcKVFRJnCpR3hohMZtSTuiFiYy8MuCY LTC: LagCM9kiRHSbfx7ycCdrsae3QxqyycrFEr ETH: 0x6bbfe42dadc1894a19ad448b8296E7e7da383D2d
 
Waffleflops (MPM and Awesome Miner tutorial creator)
BTC: 17zd54AxSZekcPkVyEiX6TrcJkUe2qja51 LTC: LeyvTNrQfrhHK8TgtB8qWzKTMmNSaRif5m ETH: 0xaE19a33f3f9568e8775A05A92DF2fca4f3a5405b
 
JaymZZZ (Profit/Hashrate/Worker tracker creator)
BTC: 17ZjS6ZJTCNWrd17kkZpgRHYZJjkq5qT5A LTC: LdGQgurUKH2J7iBBPcXWyLKUb8uUgXCfFF ETH: 0x6e259a08a1596653cbf66b2ae2c36c46ca123523
 
razorseal (YouTube video guide creator)
BTC: 13UtW3vN4DKmmjV45dL5LHwcV8svu9tuzz LTC: Lh2DiirhVhFdX9VwWS5cY9dxyRGKV9JDGs ETH:0x260fAdC32972ca102C5CA3fAF3996C609C6C0311
submitted by Gator-Empire to MiningPoolHub [link] [comments]

[Free] [Guide] Kryptex BTC Miner! Best miner for beginners!

Kryptex is a perfect, lightweight bitcoin miner that I have used on and off over the past year now. I have only used it about a month in time total, accumulating over $30, and you can expect at least $30-$70 per month with a decent enough rig (https://i.imgur.com/LruixfG.png first and only withdraw of btc and my current balancehttps://i.imgur.com/qV8RWoX.png), last I had was $9 and I only remember running it for a couple days before turning it off and forgetting about it). I personally believe this is the best mining software for beginners or even novices, with such an easy setup that only takes minutes. Not to mention they have both a lite mode and and full mode depending on how hard you want your computer to run, or if you want to run the app in the background with games or videos. I have found it doesn't affect my system much if at all, and my specs are 16gb RAM, Ryzen 5 1600 and a 1060 6GB.
You're first brought into a benchmark after logging into your account (there is a warning about antiviruses producing false positives. https://i.imgur.com/6DEqB4l.png) but down below you can find an antivirus link with the full scan of the .exe. During the benchmark the program doesn't use much computer power, only about 10% cpu, <1000mb of ram and <5% GPU. Once the benchmark is you are free to check the app and see what it has to offer!
In the settings you're first greeted with an option for Starting with Windows and an option to enable or disable the use of the CPU. After that you are given a drop down that lets you choose the mode Kyrptex will run when on in the background, I recommend Lite Mode as it will be the best for your pc during use and you can leave the heavier loads for when your pc is sleeping or inactive. With only litemode you could expect anywhere from $5-$15 depending on your rig and load, I usually sit at about $7-$13 per month. You also have an advanced settings option giving you the option to disable/enable your cpus or gpus and which algorithms you'd like to use. From Dagger Hashimoto #1 & #2, CryptoNight, Cuckoo Cycle, X16R and their recently added Equihash 150, 5.
As a beginner miner, and someone who has tried only a few programs, my word of course isnt the best, but out of the select miners I've tried, I truly believe this is the best miner program, especially for beginners who are trying to test the waters out.
You can download Kryptex at https://www.kryptex.org/?ref=4e09fec3 (referral link) or https://www.kryptex.org/ (non-referral)
Mining Consoles and Program Interface: https://i.imgur.com/ibWpG1x.pngVirusTotal: https://www.virustotal.com/gui/file/4f75a40104c19c19f8921332f8cb125e89f6b4890e473ad5252889d6b07b0b14/detection It is flagged by 4 software, but I believe these to be false positives, even one of them saying it's detected due to it being a coin miner.
submitted by vibbies to FreeStuff [link] [comments]

[Free] [Guide] Kryptex BTC Miner! Best miner for beginners!

Kryptex is a perfect, lightweight bitcoin miner that I have used on and off over the past year now. I have only used it about a month in time total, accumulating over $30, and you can expect at least $30-$70 per month with a decent enough rig (https://i.imgur.com/LruixfG.png first and only withdraw of btc and my current balancehttps://i.imgur.com/qV8RWoX.png), last I had was $9 and I only remember running it for a couple days before turning it off and forgetting about it). I personally believe this is the best mining software for beginners or even novices, with such an easy setup that only takes minutes. Not to mention they have both a lite mode and and full mode depending on how hard you want your computer to run, or if you want to run the app in the background with games or videos. I have found it doesn't affect my system much if at all, and my specs are 16gb RAM, Ryzen 5 1600 and a 1060 6GB.
You're first brought into a benchmark after logging into your account (there is a warning about antiviruses producing false positives. https://i.imgur.com/6DEqB4l.png) but down below you can find an antivirus link with the full scan of the .exe. During the benchmark the program doesn't use much computer power, only about 10% cpu, <1000mb of ram and <5% GPU. Once the benchmark is you are free to check the app and see what it has to offer!
In the settings you're first greeted with an option for Starting with Windows and an option to enable or disable the use of the CPU. After that you are given a drop down that lets you choose the mode Kyrptex will run when on in the background, I recommend Lite Mode as it will be the best for your pc during use and you can leave the heavier loads for when your pc is sleeping or inactive. With only litemode you could expect anywhere from $5-$15 depending on your rig and load, I usually sit at about $7-$13 per month. You also have an advanced settings option giving you the option to disable/enable your cpus or gpus and which algorithms you'd like to use. From Dagger Hashimoto #1 & #2, CryptoNight, Cuckoo Cycle, X16R and their recently added Equihash 150, 5.
As a beginner miner, and someone who has tried only a few programs, my word of course isnt the best, but out of the select miners I've tried, I truly believe this is the best miner program, especially for beginners who are trying to test the waters out.
You can download Kryptex at https://www.kryptex.org/?ref=4e09fec3 (referral link) or https://www.kryptex.org/ (non-referral)
Mining Consoles and Program Interface: https://i.imgur.com/ibWpG1x.pngVirusTotal: https://www.virustotal.com/gui/file/4f75a40104c19c19f8921332f8cb125e89f6b4890e473ad5252889d6b07b0b14/detection It is flagged by 4 software, but I believe these to be false positives, even one of them saying it's detected due to it being a coin miner.
submitted by vibbies to FreeStuff [link] [comments]

[Free] [Guide] Kryptex BTC Miner! Best miner for beginners!

Kryptex is a perfect, lightweight bitcoin miner that I have used on and off over the past year now. I have only used it about a month in time total, accumulating over $30, and you can expect at least $30-$70 per month with a decent enough rig (https://i.imgur.com/LruixfG.png first and only withdraw of btc and my current balancehttps://i.imgur.com/qV8RWoX.png), last I had was $9 and I only remember running it for a couple days before turning it off and forgetting about it). I personally believe this is the best mining software for beginners or even novices, with such an easy setup that only takes minutes. Not to mention they have both a lite mode and and full mode depending on how hard you want your computer to run, or if you want to run the app in the background with games or videos. I have found it doesn't affect my system much if at all, and my specs are 16gb RAM, Ryzen 5 1600 and a 1060 6GB.
You're first brought into a benchmark after logging into your account (there is a warning about antiviruses producing false positives. https://i.imgur.com/6DEqB4l.png) but down below you can find an antivirus link with the full scan of the .exe. During the benchmark the program doesn't use much computer power, only about 10% cpu, <1000mb of ram and <5% GPU. Once the benchmark is you are free to check the app and see what it has to offer!
In the settings you're first greeted with an option for Starting with Windows and an option to enable or disable the use of the CPU. After that you are given a drop down that lets you choose the mode Kyrptex will run when on in the background, I recommend Lite Mode as it will be the best for your pc during use and you can leave the heavier loads for when your pc is sleeping or inactive. With only litemode you could expect anywhere from $5-$15 depending on your rig and load, I usually sit at about $7-$13 per month. You also have an advanced settings option giving you the option to disable/enable your cpus or gpus and which algorithms you'd like to use. From Dagger Hashimoto #1 & #2, CryptoNight, Cuckoo Cycle, X16R and their recently added Equihash 150, 5.
As a beginner miner, and someone who has tried only a few programs, my word of course isnt the best, but out of the select miners I've tried, I truly believe this is the best miner program, especially for beginners who are trying to test the waters out.
You can download Kryptex at https://www.kryptex.org/?ref=4e09fec3 (referral link) or https://www.kryptex.org/ (non-referral)
Mining Consoles and Program Interface: https://i.imgur.com/ibWpG1x.pngVirusTotal: https://www.virustotal.com/gui/file/4f75a40104c19c19f8921332f8cb125e89f6b4890e473ad5252889d6b07b0b14/detection It is flagged by 4 software, but I believe these to be false positives, even one of them saying it's detected due to it being a coin miner.
submitted by vibbies to FreeStuff [link] [comments]

Theory - Warframe is console wars.

Get your tinfoil hats and strap your selves in. It's crack pot theory time.
So, as me and my buds play this game, we throw around, in a joking manner, wild, off-the-wall theories and ideas about what the races of Warframe do, why they do it, etc. Ya know, crap like Lotus and Teshin are space-mom and space-dad, and are fighting and divorced, and we the Tenno are between it all. Doesn't make sense, but it's fun.
What we have concluded is that the races of Warframe represent gaming platforms and are at war with each other, just like how people always fight about PC vs XBox vs PS.
Please note that this isn't a jab at console plebs players. It's just fun non sense.
Grineer: These guys represent XBox. They are typically greenish in color. They are also the less sophisticated/less-polished looking race, just like XBox.
Our findings for supporting this:
Grineer have Mt Dew factories. Mt Dew is a beverage often associated with the XBox culture. Here's some proof They have Mt Dew factories mainly on Ceres.
Grineer also place down inflatable barriers called Blunts. Blunt is a slang term for a marijuana joint, which, again, is something often associated with XBox players. (/montageparodies)
Grineer are also cheap, low budget. Again, something you might associate with XBox players.
Don Mattrick = Vor
Corpus: These guys represent PS/Sony. Just take a look at one of their helmets. It looks like they are wearing a PS10 on their head.
Corpus, like PS, is sleek in design. We often associate sleek, clean UIs and design with Sony. Also, Corpus are often associated with the color blue. Nepture, Uranus, their shields, the arctic guys, etc. Sony typically uses blue in their UIs for PS and in their branding.
Corpus are more distinguished and expensive, often with better technology, just like PS.
Kazuo Hirai = Alad V
Orokin: Initially, we speculated Orokin represent PC(MR). After more thought, we concluded Orokin are actually Nintendo.
These guys are legacy. Enigmatic. The birth giver of console. Like Nintendo, Orokin sit in a mysterious place who created some of the very best things that are, today, just fragments of the past. Long dead and gone, people still remember them for their biggest achievements... and treasures.
When you visit an Orokin tower or derelict, you are visiting the good ol classics of N64 and SNES, to dig up treasures like corrupted mods and Metroid.
Anyone who tries to be Nintendo go crazy.
They are perfect in almost every way. While people strive to be who Nintendo once was, there is nothing to look forward to today. A long dead race who we are still learning so much from.
Tenno:
PC Master Race. It was so obvious once we thought about it. Tenno are powerful beings who must encase themselves in a suit, much like how PCMRs have to embody their powers in a custom rig.
PCMRs also, often times, swap parts out or upgrade their PCs, much like how Tenno upgrade and swap out parts within their frames.
Getting a Forma in your frame is like upgrading your RAM, and sticking an Orokin Catalyst/Reactor in is like installing a new GPU/CPU.
We also build things at the Foundry, which in essence is like a PCMR going out to collect parts for a PC and building it. We love to build and customize. We love to make things how we see fit, where as the GrineeXBox and Corpus/PS are clones of each other - they are forced to use whatever weapons, suits, games and accessories that was cloned, in a factory, for them, only to get smashed by a Tenno PCMR in any benchmark.
Oh, also we often times go out on excavation missions to get Corpus and Grineer porn, and Sabotage missions represent us destroying the Grineer and Corpus bitcoin mining machines.
ALSO! Sometimes we get invasions, which just represent XBox and PS players fighting about who's better. (Which of course we Tenno PCMRs just swoop in and show them who's best.)
EDITS: Spelling and adding more bits to the crack pot.
EDIT 2: People keep mentioning Neptunia. Never heard of it, but I guess I have no choice but to check it out now.
submitted by Tim_Burton to Warframe [link] [comments]

DD on Crypto. Just kidding Allin AMD

Alright, I keep seeing you fucks talk about how "Bitcoin is going to make Nvidia/AMD go to the moon". I'm going to walk all you fucks through bitcoin, crypto currencies, and how they effect the GPU market.
What is Bitcoin?
Bitcoin is a decentralized ledger. That's pretty much it. A set number of bitcoin is generated per block, and each block is solved when a resulting hash is found for the corresponding proof of work. The difficulty is adjusted periodically based on a formula, meaning that as hash rate rises and falls, the number of bitcoins produced per day is roughly the same.
What does Bitcoin have to do with AMD and Nvidia?
Fucking nothing. Bitcoin is mined on proprietary hardware called Application-specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs). Neither AMD or Nvidia produce these.
Why does everyone keep talking about Bitcoin and AMD then?
Because they're fucking retarded and you're listening to retards. Bitcoin runs on the SHA-256 Hashing Function which people have custom hardware for. The Crypto driving GPU sales is ETHEREUM, NOT BITCOIN
What the fuck is Ethereum then?
Don't worry about it. It's for smug assholes who are too edgy for Bitcoin. All you need to know is it runs on a different Hashing function than Bitcoin, so if you weren't a retard you'd probably realize that the proprietary hardware I talked about earlier won't work with it. Currently Ethereum is being mined the same way Bitcoin was when it first started; on GPUs.
When are you going to tell me what to buy
Shut the fuck up, learn something or kill your self.
How many GPUs are being used to mine currently?
Currently the Ethereum Hash Rate is 73,000 GH/s. For upcoming earnings, we should instead look at the period from April to June. April 1st shows a network hash rate of 16,500 GH/s, and June 31st shows 59,200 GH/s, meaning the network hash rate increased by 42,700 GH/s for this upcoming earnings report quarter.
I've linked a decent benchmark for GPU hashrate . You should notice that all of these are quoted in MH/s, versus the Network reporting in GH/s; there are ALOT of fucking GPUs running on the network. A top of the line 1080 puts out about 20-25 MH/s, a good Radeon card does about 30. As a rough estimate, lets assume that the average card mining Ethereum currently produces about 25 MH/s. 42,700GH/s / 25MH/s means that there are 1.7 MILLION more GPUs currently mining ethereum than there were at the beginning of Q1. Based on my personal observations being involved in this, AMD is actually taking a majority market share of the sold cards just due to their superior performance compared to Nvidia's 1080s, and I'd estimate that About 50-60% of the cards currently mining Ethereum are AMD Radeons.
What does this all mean?
AMD are selling their highest margin video cards faster than they can produce them, and at ~250$ a pop with 50%-60% market capture AMD will have sold roughly 200-300 million dollars more in video cards than they did last quarter. AMD quarterly revenue last reported was just under 1 Billion. This is a 20-30% increase in revenue from last quarter, where Ethereum Hash Rate only increased by about 10,000GH/s. Even assuming a modest 30% margin for their video cards, AMD will still have almost 60 million in unexpected earnings this quarter due to crypto mining, which translates to about .06-.1 per share in earnings.
tl;dr
Ethereum will make AMD beat revenue by 20-30%. BUY AMD YOU CUCKS.
submitted by Askmeaboutmyautism to wallstreetbets [link] [comments]

Console gaming is hardly different from PC gaming, and much of what people say about PC gaming to put it above console gaming is often wrong.

I’m not sure about you, but for the past few years, I’ve been hearing people go on and on about PCs "superiority" to the console market. People cite various reasons why they believe gaming on a PC is “objectively” better than console gaming, often for reasons related to power, costs, ease-of-use, and freedom.
…Only problem: much of what they say is wrong.
There are many misconceptions being thrown about PC gaming vs Console gaming, that I believe need to be addressed. This isn’t about “PC gamers being wrong,” or “consoles being the best,” absolutely not. I just want to cut through some of the stuff people use to put down console gaming, and show that console gaming is incredibly similar to PC gaming. I mean, yes, this is someone who mainly games on console, but I also am getting a new PC that I will game on as well, not to mention the 30 PC games I already own and play. I’m not particularly partial to one over the other.
Now I will mainly be focusing on the PlayStation side of the consoles, because I know it best, but much of what I say will apply to Xbox as well. Just because I don’t point out many specific Xbox examples, doesn’t mean that they aren’t out there.

“PCs can use TVs and monitors.”

This one isn’t so much of a misconception as it is the implication of one, and overall just… confusing. This is in some articles and the pcmasterrace “why choose a PC” section, where they’re practically implying that consoles can’t do this. I mean, yes, as long as the ports of your PC match up with your screen(s) inputs, you could plug a PC into either… but you could do the same with a console, again, as long as the ports match up.
I’m guessing the idea here is that gaming monitors often use Displayport, as do most dedicated GPUs, and consoles are generally restricted to HDMI… But even so, monitors often have HDMI ports. In fact, PC Magazine has just released their list of the best gaming monitors of 2017, and every single one of them has an HDMI port. A PS4 can be plugged into these just as easily as a GTX 1080.
I mean, even if the monitoTV doesn’t have HDMI or AV to connect with your console, just use an adaptor. If you have a PC with ports that doesn’t match your monitoTV… use an adapter. I don’t know what the point of this argument is, but it’s made a worrying amount of times.

“On PC, you have a wide range of controller options, but on console you’re stuck with the standard controller."

Are you on PlayStation and wish you could use a specific type of controller that suits your favorite kind of gameplay? Despite what some may believe, you have just as many options as PC.
Want to play fighting games with a classic arcade-style board, featuring the buttons and joystick? Here you go!
Want to get serious about racing and get something more accurate and immersive than a controller? Got you covered.
Absolutely crazy about flying games and, like the racers, want something better than a controller? Enjoy!
Want Wii-style motion controls? Been around since the PS3. If you prefer the form factor of the Xbox One controller but you own a PS4, Hori’s got you covered. And of course, if keyboard and mouse it what keeps you on PC, there’s a PlayStation compatible solution for that. Want to use the keyboard and mouse that you already own? Where there’s a will, there’s a way.
Of course, these aren’t isolated examples, there are plenty of options for each of these kind of controllers. You don’t have to be on PC to enjoy alternate controllers.

“On PC you could use Steam Link to play anywhere in your house and share games with others.”

PS4 Remote play app on PC/Mac, PSTV, and PS Vita.
PS Family Sharing.
Using the same PSN account on multiple PS4s/Xbox Ones and PS3s/360s, or using multiple accounts on the same console.
In fact, if multiple users are on the same PS4, only one has to buy the game for both users to play it on that one PS4. On top of that, only one of them has to have PS Plus for both to play online (if the one with PS Plus registers the PS4 as their main system).
PS4 Share Play; if two people on separate PS4s want to play a game together that only one of them owns, they can join a Party and the owner of the game can have their friend play with them in the game.
Need I say more?

“Gaming is more expensive on console.”

Part one, the Software
This is one that I find… genuinely surprising. There’s been a few times I’ve mentioned that part of the reason I chose a PS4 is for budget gaming, only to told that “games are cheaper on Steam.” To be fair, there are a few games on PSN/XBL that are more expensive than they are on Steam, so I can see how someone could believe this… but apparently they forgot about disks.
Dirt Rally, a hardcore racing sim game that’s… still $60 on all 3 platforms digitally… even though its successor is out.
So does this mean you have to pay full retail for this racing experience? Nope, because disk prices.
Just Cause 3, an insane open-world experience that could essentially be summed up as “break stuff, screw physics.” And it’s a good example of where the Steam price is lower than PSN and XBL:
Not by much, but still cheaper on Steam, so cheaper on PC… Until you look at the disk prices.
See my point? Often times the game is cheaper on console because of the disk alternative that’s available for practically every console-available game. Even when the game is brand new.
Dirt 4 - Remember that Dirt Rally successor I mentioned?
Yes, you could either buy this relatively new game digitally for $60, or just pick up the disk for a discounted price. And again, this is for a game that came out 2 months ago, and even it’s predecessor’s digital cost is locked at $60. Of course, I’m not going to ignore the fact that Dirt 4 is currently (as of writing this) discounted on Steam, but on PSN it also happens to be discounted for about the same amount.
Part 2: the Subscription
Now… let’s not ignore the elephant in the room: PS Plus and Xbox Gold. Now these would be ignorable, if they weren’t required for online play (on the PlayStation side, it’s only required for PS4, but still). So yes, it’s still something that will be included in the cost of your PS4 or Xbox One/360, assuming you play online. Bummer, right?
Here’s the thing, although that’s the case, although you have to factor in this $60 cost with your console, you can make it balance out, at worst, and make it work out for you as a budget gamer, at best. As nice as it would be to not have to deal with the price if you don’t want to, it’s not like it’s a problem if you use it correctly.
Imagine going to a new restaurant. This restaurant has some meals that you can’t get anywhere else, and fair prices compared to competitors. Only problem: you have to pay a membership fee to have the sides. Now you can have the main course, sit down and enjoy your steak or pasta, but if you want to have a side to have a full meal, you have to pay an annual fee.
Sounds shitty, right? But here’s the thing: not only does this membership allow you to have sides with your meal, but it also allows you to eat two meals for free every month, and also gives you exclusive discounts for other meals, drinks, and desserts.
Let’s look at PS Plus for a minute: for $60 per year, you get:
  • 2 free PS4 games, every month
  • 2 free PS3 games, every month
  • 1 PS4/PS3 and Vita compatible game, and 1 Vita-only game, every month
  • Exclusive/Extended discounts, especially during the weekly/seasonal sales (though you don’t need PS Plus to get sales, PS Plus members get to enjoy the best sales)
  • access to online multiplayer
So yes, you’re paying extra because of that membership, but what you get with that deal pays for it and then some. In fact, let’s ignore the discounts for a minute: you get 24 free PS4 games, 24 free PS3 games, and 12 Vita only + 12 Vita compatible games, up to 72 free games every year. Even if you only one of these consoles, that’s still 24 free games a year. Sure, maybe you get games for the month that you don’t like, then just wait until next month.
In fact, let’s look at Just Cause 3 again. It was free for PS Plus members in August, which is a pretty big deal. Why is this significant? Because it’s, again, a $60 digital game. That means with this one download, you’ve balanced out your $60 annual fee. Meaning? Every free game after that is money saved, every discount after that is money saved. And this is a trend: every year, PS Plus will release a game that balances out the entire service cost, then another 23 more that will only add icing to that budget cake. Though, you could just count games as paying off PS Plus until you hit $60 in savings, but still.
All in all, PS Plus, and Xbox Gold which offers similar options, saves you money. On top of that, again, you don't need to have these to get discounts, but with these memberships, you get more discounts.
Now, I’ve seen a few Steam games go up for free for a week, but what about being free for an entire month? Not to mention that; even if you want to talk about Steam Summer Sales, what about the PSN summer sale, or again, disc sale discounts? Now a lot of research and math would be needed to see if every console gamer would save money compared to every Steam gamer for the same games, but at the very least? The costs will balance out, at worst.
Part 3, the Systems
  • Xbox and PS2: $299
  • Xbox 360 and PS3: $299 and $499, respectively
  • Xbox One and PS4: $499 and $399, respectively.
Rounded up a few dollars, that’s $1,000 - $1,300 in day-one consoles, just to keep up with the games! Crazy right? So called budget systems, such a rip-off.
Well, keep in mind that the generations here aren’t short.
The 6th generation, from the launch of the PS2 to the launch of the next generation consoles, lasted 5 years, 6 years based on the launch of the PS3 (though you could say it was 9 or 14, since the Xbox wasn’t discontinued until 2009, and the PS2 was supported all the way to 2014, a year after the PS4 was released). The 7th gen lasted 7 - 8 years, again depending on whether you count the launch of the Xbox 360 to PS3. The 8th gen so far has lasted 4 years. That’s 17 years that the console money is spread over. If you had a Netflix subscription for it’s original $8 monthly plan for that amount of time, that would be over $1,600 total.
And let’s be fair here, just like you could upgrade your PC hardware whenever you wanted, you didn’t have to get a console from launch. Let’s look at PlayStation again for example: In 2002, only two years after its release, the PS2 retail price was cut from $300 to $200. The PS3 Slim, released 3 years after the original, was $300, $100-$200 lower than the retail cost. The PS4? You could’ve either gotten the Uncharted bundle for $350, or one of the PS4 Slim bundles for $250. This all brings it down to $750 - $850, which again, is spread over a decade and a half. This isn’t even counting used consoles, sales, or the further price cuts that I didn’t mention.
Even if that still sounds like a lot of money to you, even if you’re laughing at the thought of buying new systems every several years, because your PC “is never obsolete,” tell me: how many parts have you changed out in your PC over the years? How many GPUs have you been through? CPUs? Motherboards? RAM sticks, monitors, keyboards, mice, CPU coolers, hard drives— that adds up. You don’t need to replace your entire system to spend a lot of money on hardware.
Even if you weren’t upgrading for the sake of upgrading, I’d be amazed if the hardware you’ve been pushing by gaming would last for about 1/3 of that 17 year period. Computer parts aren’t designed to last forever, and really won’t when you’re pushing them with intensive gaming for hours upon hours. Generally speaking, your components might last you 6-8 years, if you’ve got the high-end stuff. But let’s assume you bought a system 17 years ago that was a beast for it’s time, something so powerful, that even if it’s parts have degraded over time, it’s still going strong. Problem is: you will have to upgrade something eventually.
Even if you’ve managed to get this far into the gaming realm with the same 17 year old hardware, I’m betting you didn’t do it with a 17 year Operating System. How much did Windows 7 cost you? Or 8.1? Or 10? Oh, and don’t think you can skirt the cost by getting a pre-built system, the cost of Windows is embedded into the cost of the machine (why else would Microsoft allow their OS to go on so many machines).
Sure, Windows 10 was a free upgrade for a year, but that’s only half of it’s lifetime— You can’t get it for free now, and not for the past year. On top of that, the free period was an upgrade; you had to pay for 7 or 8 first anyway.
Point is, as much as one would like to say that they didn’t need to buy a new system every so often for the sake of gaming, that doesn’t mean they haven’t been paying for hardware, and even if they’ve only been PC gaming recently, you’ll be spending money on hardware soon enough.

“PC is leading the VR—“

Let me stop you right there.
If you add together the total number of Oculus Rifts and HTC Vives sold to this day, and threw in another 100,000 just for the sake of it, that number would still be under the number of PSVR headsets sold.
Why could this possibly be? Well, for a simple reason: affordability. The systems needed to run the PC headsets costs $800+, and the headsets are $500 - $600, when discounted. PSVR on the other hand costs $450 for the full bundle (headset, camera, and move controllers, with a demo disc thrown in), and can be played on either a $250 - $300 console, or a $400 console, the latter recommended. Even if you want to say that the Vive and Rift are more refined, a full PSVR set, system and all, could cost just over $100 more than a Vive headset alone.
If anything, PC isn’t leading the VR gaming market, the PS4 is. It’s the system bringing VR to the most consumers, showing them what the future of gaming could look like. Not to mention that as the PlayStation line grows more powerful (4.2 TFLOP PS4 Pro, 10 TFLOP “PS5…”), it won’t be long until the PlayStation line can use the same VR games as PC.
Either way, this shows that there is a console equivalent to the PC VR options. Sure, there are some games you'd only be able to play on PC, but there are also some games you'd only be able to play on PSVR.
…Though to be fair, if we’re talking about VR in general, these headsets don’t even hold a candle to, surprisingly, Gear VR.

“If it wasn’t for consoles holding devs back, then they would be able to make higher quality games.”

This one is based on the idea that because of how “low spec” consoles are, that when a developer has to take them in mind, then they can’t design the game to be nearly as good as it would be otherwise. I mean, have you ever seen the minimum specs for games on Steam?
GTA V
  • CPU: Intel Core 2 Quad CPU Q6600 @ 2.40GHz (4 CPUs) / AMD Phenom 9850 Quad-Core Processor (4 CPUs) @ 2.5GHz
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA 9800 GT 1GB / AMD HD 4870 1GB (DX 10, 10.1, 11)
Just Cause 3
  • CPU: Intel Core i5-2500k, 3.3GHz / AMD Phenom II X6 1075T 3GHz
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 670 (2GB) / AMD Radeon HD 7870 (2GB)
Fallout 4
  • CPU: Intel Core i5-2300 2.8 GHz/AMD Phenom II X4 945 3.0 GHz or equivalent
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA GTX 550 Ti 2GB/AMD Radeon HD 7870 2GB or equivalent
Overwatch
  • CPU: Intel Core i3 or AMD Phenom™ X3 8650
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA® GeForce® GTX 460, ATI Radeon™ HD 4850, or Intel® HD Graphics 4400
Witcher 3
  • Processor: Intel CPU Core i5-2500K 3.3GHz / AMD CPU Phenom II X4 940
  • Memory: 6 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Nvidia GPU GeForce GTX 660 / AMD GPU Radeon HD 7870
Actually, bump up all the memory requirements to 8 GBs, and those are some decent specs, relatively speaking. And keep in mind these are the minimum specs to even open the games. It’s almost as if the devs didn’t worry about console specs when making a PC version of the game, because this version of the game isn’t on console. Or maybe even that the consoles aren’t holding the games back that much because they’re not that weak. Just a hypothesis.
But I mean, the devs are still ooobviously having to take weak consoles into mind right? They could make their games sooo much more powerful if they were PC only, right? Right?
No. Not even close.
iRacing
  • CPU: Intel Core i3, i5, i7 or better or AMD Bulldozer or better
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVidia GeForce 2xx series or better, 1GB+ dedicated video memory / AMD 5xxx series or better, 1GB+ dedicated video memory
Playerunknown’s Battlegrounds
  • CPU: Intel Core i3-4340 / AMD FX-6300
  • Memory: 6 GB RAM
  • GPU: nVidia GeForce GTX 660 2GB / AMD Radeon HD 7850 2GB
These are PC only games. That’s right, no consoles to hold them back, they don’t have to worry about whether an Xbox One could handle it. Yet, they don’t require anything more than the Multiplatform games.
Subnautica
  • CPU: Intel Haswell 2 cores / 4 threads @ 2.5Ghz or equivalent
  • Memory: 4GB
  • GPU: Intel HD 4600 or equivalent - This includes most GPUs scoring greater than 950pts in the 3DMark Fire Strike benchmark
Rust
  • CPU: 2 ghz
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • DirectX: Version 11 (they don’t even list a GPU)
So what’s the deal? Theoretically, if developers don’t have to worry about console specs, then why aren’t they going all-out and making games that no console could even dream of supporting?
Low-end PCs.
What, did you think people only game on Steam if they spent at least $500 on gaming hardware? Not all PC gamers have gaming-PC specs, and if devs close their games out to players who don’t have the strongest of PCs, then they’d be losing out on a pretty sizable chunk of their potential buyers.
Saying “devs having to deal with consoles is holding gaming back” is like saying “racing teams having to deal with Ford is holding GT racing back.” A: racing teams don’t have to deal with Ford if they don’t want to, which is probably why many of them don’t, and B: even though Ford doesn’t make the fastest cars overall, they still manage to make cars that are awesome on their own, they don’t even need to be compared to anything else to know that they make good cars.
I want to go back to that previous point though, developers having to deal with low-end PCs, because it’s integral to the next point:

“PCs are more powerful, gaming on PC provides a better experience.”

This one isn’t so much of a misconception as it is… misleading.
Did you know that according to the Steam Hardware & Software Survey (July 2017) , the percentage of Steam gamers who use a GPU that's less powerful than that of a PS4 Slim’s GPU is well over 50%? Things get dismal when compared to the PS4 Pro (Or Xbox One X). On top of that, the percentage of PC gamers who own a Nvidia 10 series card is about 20% (about 15% for the 1060, 1080 and 1070 owners).
Now to be fair, the large majority of gamers have CPUs with considerably high clock speeds, which is the main factor in CPU gaming performance. But, the number of Steam gamers with as much RAM or more than a PS4 or Xbox One is less than 50%, which can really bottleneck what those CPUs can handle.
These numbers are hardly better than they were in 2013, all things considered. Sure, a PS3/360 weeps in the face of even a $400 PC, but in this day in age, consoles have definitely caught up.
Sure, we could mention the fact that even 1% of Steam accounts represents over 1 million accounts, but that doesn’t really matter compared to the 10s of millions of 8th gen consoles sold; looking at it that way, sure the number of Nvidia 10 series owners is over 20 million, but that ignores the fact that there are over 5 times more 8th gen consoles sold than that.
Basically, even though PCs run on a spectrum, saying they're more powerful “on average” is actually wrong. Sure, they have the potential for being more powerful, but most of the time, people aren’t willing to pay the premium to reach those extra bits of performance.
Now why is this important? What matters are the people who spent the premium cost for premium parts, right? Because of the previous point: PCs don’t have some ubiquitous quality over the consoles, developers will always have to keep low-end PCs in mind, because not even half of all PC players can afford the good stuff, and you have to look at the top quarter of Steam players before you get to PS4-Pro-level specs. If every Steam player were to get a PS4 Pro, it would be an upgrade for over 60% of them, and 70% of them would be getting an upgrade with the Xbox One X.
Sure, you could still make the argument that when you pay more for PC parts, you get a better experience than you could with a console. We can argue all day about budget PCs, but a console can’t match up to a $1,000 PC build. It’s the same as paying more for car parts, in the end you get a better car. However, there is a certain problem with that…

“You pay a little more for a PC, you get much more quality.”

The idea here is that the more you pay for PC parts, the performance increases at a faster rate than the price does. Problem: that’s not how technology works. Paying twice as much doesn’t get you twice the quality the majority of the time.
For example, let’s look at graphics cards, specifically the GeForce 10 series cards, starting with the GTX 1050.
  • 1.8 TFLOP
  • 1.35 GHz base clock
  • 2 GB VRAM
  • $110
This is our reference, our basis of comparison. Any percentages will be based on the 1050’s specs.
Now let’s look at the GTX 1050 Ti, the 1050’s older brother.
  • 2.1 TFLOP
  • 1.29 GHz base clock
  • 4 GB VRAM
  • $140 retail
This is pretty good. You only increase the price by about 27%, and you get an 11% increase in floating point speed and a 100% increase (double) in VRAM. Sure you get a slightly lower base clock, but the rest definitely makes up for it. In fact, according to GPU boss, the Ti managed 66 fps, or a 22% increase in frame rate for Battlefield 4, and a 54% increase in mHash/second in bitcoin mining. The cost increase is worth it, for the most part.
But let’s get to the real meat of it; what happens when we double our budget? Surely we should see a massive increase performance, I bet some of you are willing to bet that twice the cost means more than twice the performance.
The closest price comparison for double the cost is the GTX 1060 (3 GB), so let’s get a look at that.
  • 3.0 TFLOP
  • 1.5 GHz base clock
  • 3 GB VRAM
  • $200 retail
Well… not substantial, I’d say. About a 50% increase in floating point speed, an 11% increase in base clock speed, and a 1GB decrease in VRAM. For [almost] doubling the price, you don’t get much.
Well surely raw specs don’t tell the full story, right? Well, let’s look at some real wold comparisons. Once again, according to GPU Boss, there’s a 138% increase in hashes/second for bitcoin mining, and at 99 fps, an 83% frame rate increase in Battlefield 4. Well, then, raw specs does not tell the whole story!
Here’s another one, the 1060’s big brother… or, well, slightly-more-developed twin.
  • 3.9 TFLOP
  • 1.5 GHz base clock
  • 6 GB VRAM
  • $250 retail
Seems reasonable, another $50 for a decent jump in power and double the memory! But, as we’ve learned, we shouldn’t look at the specs for the full story.
I did do a GPU Boss comparison, but for the BF4 frame rate, I had to look at Tom’s Hardware (sorry miners, GPU boss didn’t cover the mHash/sec spec either). What’s the verdict? Well, pretty good, I’d say. With 97 FPS, a 79% increase over the 1050— wait. 97? That seems too low… I mean, the 3GB version got 99.
Well, let’s see what Tech Power Up has to say...
94.3 fps. 74% increase. Huh.
Alright alright, maybe that was just a dud. We can gloss over that I guess. Ok, one more, but let’s go for the big fish: the GTX 1080.
  • 9.0 TFLOP
  • 1.6 GHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $500 retail
That jump in floating point speed definitely has to be something, and 4 times the VRAM? Sure it’s 5 times the price, but as we saw, raw power doesn’t always tell the full story. GPU Boss returns to give us the run down, how do these cards compare in the real world?
Well… a 222% (over three-fold) increase in mHash speed, and a 218% increase in FPS for Battlefield 4. That’s right, for 5 times the cost, you get 3 times the performance. Truly, the raw specs don’t tell the full story.
You increase the cost by 27%, you increase frame rate in our example game by 22%. You increase the cost by 83%, you increase the frame rate by 83%. Sounds good, but if you increase the cost by 129%, and you get a 79% (-50% cost/power increase) increase in frame rate. You increase it by 358%, and you increase the frame rate by 218% (-140% cost/power increase). That’s not paying “more for much more power,” that’s a steep drop-off after the third cheapest option.
In fact, did you know that you have to get to the 1060 (6GB) before you could compare the GTX line to a PS4 Pro? Not to mention that at $250, the price of a 1060 (6GB) you could get an entire PS4 Slim bundle, or that you have to get to the 1070 before you beat the Xbox One X.
On another note, let’s look at a PS4 Slim…
  • 1.84 TFLOP
  • 800 MHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $300 retail
…Versus a PS4 Pro.
  • 4.2 TFLOP
  • 911 MHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $400 retail
128% increase in floating point speed, 13% increase in clock speed, for a 25% difference in cost. Unfortunately there is no Battlefield 4 comparison to make, but in BF1, the frame rate is doubled (30 fps to 60) and the textures are taken to 11. For what that looks like, I’ll leave it up to this bloke. Not to even mention that you can even get the texture buffs in 4K. Just like how you get a decent increase in performance based on price for the lower-cost GPUs, the same applies here.
It’s even worse when you look at the CPU for a gaming PC. The more money you spend, again, the less of a benefit you get per dollar. Hardware Unboxed covers this in a video comparing different levels of Intel CPUs. One thing to note is that the highest i7 option (6700K) in this video was almost always within 10 FPS (though for a few games, 15 FPS) of a certain CPU in that list for just about all of the games.
…That CPU was the lowest i3 (6100) option. The lowest i3 was $117 and the highest i7 was $339, a 189% price difference for what was, on average, a 30% or less difference in frame rate. Even the lowest Pentium option (G4400, $63) was often able to keep up with the i7.
The CPU and GPU are usually the most expensive and power-consuming parts of a build, which is why I focused on them (other than the fact that they’re the two most important parts of a gaming PC, outside of RAM). With both, this “pay more to get much more performance” idea is pretty much the inverse of the truth.

“The console giants are bad for game developers, Steam doesn't treat developers as bad as Microsoft or especially Sony.”

Now one thing you might’ve heard is that the PS3 was incredibly difficult for developers to make games for, which for some, fueled the idea that console hardware is difficult too develop on compared to PC… but this ignores a very basic idea that we’ve already touched on: if the devs don’t want to make the game compatible with a system, they don’t have to. In fact, this is why Left 4 Dead and other Valve games aren’t on PS3, because they didn’t want to work with it’s hardware, calling it “too complex.” This didn’t stop the game from selling well over 10 million units worldwide. If anything, this was a problem for the PS3, not the dev team.
This also ignores that games like LittleBigPlanet, Grand Theft Auto IV, and Metal Gear Solid 4 all came out in the same year as Left 4 Dead (2008) on PS3. Apparently, plenty of other dev teams didn’t have much of a problem with the PS3’s hardware, or at the very least, they got used to it soon enough.
On top of that, when developing the 8th gen consoles, both Sony and Microsoft sought to use CPUs that were easier for developers, which included making decisions that considered apps for the consoles’ usage for more than gaming. On top of that, using their single-chip proprietary CPUs is cheaper and more energy efficient than buying pre-made CPUs and boards, which is far better of a reason for using them than some conspiracy about Sony and MS trying to make devs' lives harder.
Now, console exclusives are apparently a point of contention: it’s often said that exclusive can cause developers to go bankrupt. However, exclusivity doesn’t have to be a bad thing for the developer. For example, when Media Molecule had to pitch their game to a publisher (Sony, coincidentally), they didn’t end up being tied into something detrimental to them.
Their initial funding lasted for 6 months. From then, Sony offered additional funding, in exchange for Console Exclusivity. This may sound concerning to some, but the game ended up going on to sell almost 6 million units worldwide and launched Media Molecule into the gaming limelight. Sony later bought the development studio, but 1: this was in 2010, two years after LittleBigPlanet’s release, and 2: Media Molecule seem pretty happy about it to this day. If anything, signing up with Sony was one of the best things they could’ve done, in their opinion.
Does this sound like a company that has it out for developers? There are plenty of examples that people will use to put Valve in a good light, but even Sony is comparatively good to developers.

“There are more PC gamers.”

The total number of active PC gamers on Steam has surpassed 120 million, which is impressive, especially considering that this number is double that of 2013’s figure (65 million). But the number of monthly active users on Xbox Live and PSN? About 120 million (1, 2) total. EDIT: You could argue that this isn't an apples-to-apples comparison, sure, so if you want to, say, compare the monthly number of Steam users to console? Steam has about half of what consoles do, at 67 million.
Now, back to the 65 million total user figure for Steam, the best I could find for reference for PlayStation's number was an article giving the number of registered PSN accounts in 2013, 150 million. In a similar 4-year period (2009 - 2013), the number of registered PSN accounts didn’t double, it sextupled, or increased by 6 fold. Considering how the PS4 is already at 2/3 of the number of sales the PS3 had, even though it’s currently 3 years younger than its predecessor, I’m sure this trend is at least generally consistent.
For example, let’s look at DOOM 2016, an awesome faced-paced shooting title with graphics galore… Of course, on a single platform, it sold best on PC/Steam. 2.36 million Steam sales, 2.05 million PS4 sales, 1.01 million Xbox One sales.
But keep in mind… when you add the consoles sales together, you get over 3 million sales on the 8th gen systems. Meaning: this game was best sold on console. In fact, the Steam sales have only recently surpassed the PS4 sales. By the way VG charts only shows sales for physical copies of the games, so the number of PS4 and Xbox sales, when digital sales are included, are even higher than 3 million.
This isn’t uncommon, by the way.
Even with the games were the PC sales are higher than either of the consoles, there generally are more console sales total. But, to be fair, this isn’t anything new. The number of PC gamers hasn’t dominated the market, the percentages have always been about this much. PC can end up being the largest single platform for games, but consoles usually sell more copies total.
EDIT: There were other examples but... Reddit has a 40,000-character limit.

"Modding is only on PC."

Xbox One is already working on it, and Bethesda is helping with that.
PS4 isn't far behind either. You could argue that these are what would be the beta stages of modding, but that just means modding on consoles will only grow.

What’s the Point?

This isn’t to say that there’s anything wrong with PC gaming, and this isn’t to exalt consoles. I’m not here to be the hipster defending the little guy, nor to be the one to try to put down someone/thing out of spite. This is about showing that PCs and consoles are overall pretty similar because there isn’t much dividing them, and that there isn’t anything wrong with being a console gamer. There isn’t some chasm separating consoles and PCs, at the end of the day they’re both computers that are (generally) designed for gaming. This about unity as gamers, to try to show that there shouldn’t be a massive divide just because of the computer system you game on. I want gamers to be in an environment where specs don't separate us; whether you got a $250 PS4 Slim or just built a $2,500 gaming PC, we’re here to game and should be able to have healthy interactions regardless of your platform.
I’m well aware that this isn’t going to fix… much, but this needs to be said: there isn’t a huge divide between the PC and consoles, they’re far more similar than people think. There are upsides and downsides that one has that the other doesn’t on both sides. There’s so much more I could touch on, like how you could use SSDs or 3.5 inch hard drives with both, or that even though PC part prices go down over time, so do consoles, but I just wanted to touch on the main points people try to use to needlessly separate the two kinds of systems (looking at you PCMR) and correct them, to get the point across.
I thank anyone who takes the time to read all of this, and especially anyone who doesn’t take what I say out of context. I also want to note that, again, this isn’tanti-PC gamer.” If it were up to me, everyone would be a hybrid gamer.
Cheers.
submitted by WhyyyCantWeBeFriends to unpopularopinion [link] [comments]

Guide: Getting started with NiceHash

Hello Everyone,
In one of my my previous posts, quite a few people noticed that I had a cryptocurrency miner open on my second monitor and have requested that I create a guide on how to mine cryptocurrencies when their computer is not in use. I am not looking to start a GPU price war or any hatred towards anyone. I just want to share an easy way to get started mining cryptocurrency and allow people to earn a few extra dollars when their PCs are not in use. I am a gamer myself and love having the spare cash to upgrade hardware or a new game every once in a while. I hope this helps everyone who is interested and will do my best to answer any questions.
I am going to outline how to use NiceHash, which is the easiest way to get started. Please keep in mind that this is not the most profitable method to mining at the moment, but will provide a return to most users and is compatible with AMD, Nvidia, and CPU mining. I always suggest to check what you can earn with your current hardware first and also consider the price of electric before getting started. An estimator can be found here: https://www.nicehash.com/profitability-calculator
Before starting, I would like to remind everyone that mining does cause a higher load on your hardware. Due to this the temperatures of your hardware will rise and I suggest that you keep an eye on them. Make sure you know the safe temperature ratings for your hardware, have proper cooling, a power supply that can support your hardware under full load, and that your hardware is clean. Remove any dust or debris before getting started to ensure that your PC is running at its best. Even if you aren't mining, these things should be kept in order.
Getting Started:
  1. Head over to NiceHash.com and in the middle of the page, in the box that says "Sell" click on the green "Download" button.
  2. Download and install the supported miner for your hardware. (Nvidia or AMD)
  3. Head back to NiceHash.com and create an account by clicking on "Register" in the upper right hand corner. You may be given the option to setup an account as a "Buyer" or a "Seller". Since we are selling our compute power for bitcoin, we are "Sellers".
  4. Once your account is created, open up the NiceHash miner on your computer. You should see two windows open, a command prompt which is the miner and a graphical user interface (GUI). In the GUI, you will need to log in to the account you have created so the earnings will be deposited in to your NiceHash account.
  5. Open up your favorite hardware monitoring application (Such as Open Hardware Monitor) so you can monitor temperatures and performance and close out of all other programs except for NiceHash and the hardware monitor. Benchmark your hardware inside the NiceHash GUI. This will test your hardware and allow the application to automatically mine the most profitable crypto algorithm available and help maximize your profit. Also, you can select the hardware you wish to mine with or disable from mining here as well.
  6. Because NiceHash has no fee to deposit your earnings to CoinBase, I am recommending them as the place to deposit and sell your bitcoin earnings. Head over to https://www.coinbase.com/join/597148c1a66a5b0156923d1e (This is my referral link. I would appreciate it if you use it, but if you wish note to, feel free to remove go directly to the site. It doesn't cost you anything or affect your account in any way, but it gives me a small bonus for referring people and I would appreciate it very much.) and create an account. Coinbase will allow you to cash out your bitcoin earnings in to your bank account or keep them for later. We all hope the price rises again, right?!
  7. Go back to your NiceHash account and click on "Wallet" in the top bar. This is where your earnings will be displayed as well as the ability to link with your CoinBase account. When you have mined enough, you can withdraw to your CoinBase account. All of the information should be provided on the websites and should be pretty simple to follow. If you have any questions regarding these sites, please ask!
  8. Close out of all your open programs except for NiceHash and your hardware monitor, then click the green "Start" button. This will start mining and you will see output in the command prompt such as your hash rate and the algorithm that NiceHash is mining. It will also display your account balance, your daily estimated earnings, and other information. You may notice that your computer is sluggish or not responding as quickly as normal due to it being under load.
  9. ???
  10. PROFIT!!!
I hope you all find this useful and that you can earn a few extra bucks by mining. Whether it be a free coffee, a new game, or just the ability to get in on the bitcoin gold rush, I hope this helps everyone who is interested and gets a few people started. If you have any questions please ask. I will try to stay up to date on this post and edit it with the most frequently asked questions.
submitted by EatMyPoopiePies to cryptomining [link] [comments]

Tips for improving 1080 Ti performance?

Hi there! So I've had my 1080 Ti for almost a year now, and it seems like it isn't performing as well as it should.
In a game like Overwatch, I'm getting 130ish FPS even on low settings, no V-sync or anything, at 1440p. I see that benchmarks that people have posted are about 200FPS with max graphics settings at 1440p.
In FFXV, I've struggled to maintain above 60FPS with max settings in some areas, when I should be getting 80-120...
My specs are as follows:
Intel i7-8700K currently at stock, cooled by a Corsair Hydro H100i v2
GTX 1080 Ti, liquid cooled and at stock settings
16 GB DDR4 2400 RAM
3 SSDs; 1 NVMe boot drive, a 1 TB SATA M.2 SSD, and a 250 GB SATA SSD
1000W power supply
144hz gaming monitor
I've noticed that my GPU Temps have gone up lately; it used to idle at around 25°C, but now idles at 37-40°C.
I currently have my Windows and Nvidia power settings set to 'prefer maximum performance.'
At one point in time, I tried overclocking my GPU - and at one point I unlocked the voltage control and may have gone a bit too high. But I hadn't set it like that for very long, and I simply stuck with a modest overclock. But I noticed a few days ago that if I adjusted the overclock, my screen would static for less than a second before returning to normal. I'm guessing this isn't normal? I'm not currently overclocked.
As another note, I noticed the increase in idle temps long before the overclocking.
And finally, at one point I was briefly infected with a bitcoin mining program - I say briefly because it was stopped within seconds by my anti-virus. I've wiped my computer quite a few times so I doubt it's still there, but I felt I should mention it.
submitted by BaakiBree to computers [link] [comments]

Nicehash setup and benchmarking- bitcoin mining Bitcoin online GPU Mining Without Invest Profits Mining Fast Withdrawal Should YOU be GPU MINING Cryptocurrency in 2020?! Free Bitcoin GPU Mining Auto Time 2019 Gpu mining Bitcoin hack Script 2020

The Bitcoin.com mining pool has the lowest share reject rate (0.15%) we've ever seen. Other pools have over 0.30% rejected shares. Furthermore, the Bitcoin.com pool has a super responsive and reliable support team. GPU MINING HASHRATES. The complete list of mining hashrate benchmarks for AMD and NVidia Graphics cards. Still many values to be filled in, but we will get there! (Ethash) Hashrates (X16R, BEAM, GRINCUCKATOO29, GRINCUCKATOO31) Hashrates (CryptoNight, CNR, CNHeavy, CNV7, CNV8) Hashrates GPU Manufacter Model Core Clock Mem Clock Operating system Driver Version Mining Software Power Consumption Currency Algorythm Speed Revenue / Day Revenue / Month Hashrate / Watt Revenue / Month (electricity deducted) Proof; RIGS: NVIDIA: 13x ASUS GTX 1080 Ti--Windows 10: Claymore v10: 1158: Ethash: 464000000: $11.38: $341.38: 0.40: $ 237.99 Everyone can start mining without the need for deep technical knowledge about cryptocurrency mining. It is tailored for ease of use and features a very simple interface. When running, NiceHash Miner is connected to NiceHash platform and NiceHash open hashing power marketplace. Bitcoin Mining GPU Performance(current Bitcoin price of $8,500) GPU GPU Earnings/day(zero electricity cost) GPU Earnings/day($0.05/kWh electricity cost) GPU Earnings/day($0.10/kWh electricity cost) GPU Price(cheapest I found for used or new for newest models) AMD Radeon R9 380: $0.48: $0.31: $0.14: $80: AMD Radeon R9 FURY: $0.44: $0.18-$0.09

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Nicehash setup and benchmarking- bitcoin mining

We review GPU mining profitable and the best graphics cards for mining in 2020 along with CP... Skip navigation ... Bitcoin will crash 75% soon in 2020 before the 2021 BTC bull run can begin ... New Unlimited Bitcoin GPU Mining Without Invest Profits Mining Fast Withdrawal https://bit.ly/2ZUkYW5 https://bit.ly/2V1Z01z https://bit.ly/3bB3eTf https://b... But it works only when you do a proper bench-marking of your graphics card and select the most profitable algorithm for mining bitcoin. Here is the complete benchmark demo to make your mining rig ... GPU Bitcoin Mining Log into the system with your Bitcoin Wallet Address to do the Bitcoin Mining with the GPU power. 1. Login by Bitcoin Wallet Address--Ok 2. Click on START MINING (Green Area) 3 ... Earn Bitcoin Buy Bitcoin Sell Bitcoin Mining Bitcoin Bitcoin Bitcoin Hack Hack Bitcoin Script Bitcoin Hack Script Hack Bitcoin Cryptocurrency ETH,BTC,BCH,ETC bitcoin software 2019, bitcoin ...

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